The Arts Cultural Center celebrates 4 new exhibitions

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Citizen staff

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The Cultural Arts Center at Glen Allen celebrated the opening of four new exhibits with “Art Night” on September 15.

As well as highlighting the four exhibits – “Kaleidoscope – Rekindling a History”, “The Peaches Will Be Blue”, “Richmond: A Diary” and “Unusual Turnings” – the event also included live music and artifacts from local manufacturers. The artists behind the exhibitions were also present to discuss their works with the participants.

“Kaleidoscope” features a variety of artful and colorful quilts from Kuumba Afrikan American Quilting Guild – works ranging from reinvented traditional patterns to modern interpretations of fiber art. Kuumba has been around since 2012 and is made up of members who want to develop art that brings African American history and culture to life.

“The Peaches Will Be Blue” is an exhibition of collages and temporary acrylic paintings by Kay Vass Darling, who uses color and pattern to play with the subject of still life.

“Richmond: A Diary” is a series of paintings by John Price that capture a variety of moments in Richmond that the artist has shared with his girlfriend over the years. The diary records daily events and personal thoughts that shape their collective memory.

“Unusual Turnings” shows the wooden sculptures that can be made from local wood turned on a lathe. Barbara Dill is a local artist recognized internationally as an innovator in woodturning.

For more details, visit artsglenallen.com.

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