Cultural center – Shul 21 http://shul21.org/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 21:25:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://shul21.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-17-120x120.png Cultural center – Shul 21 http://shul21.org/ 32 32 West Park Cultural Center’s DanceLogic Now Accepting Fall 2022 Registrations https://shul21.org/west-park-cultural-centers-dancelogic-now-accepting-fall-2022-registrations/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 21:25:00 +0000 https://shul21.org/west-park-cultural-centers-dancelogic-now-accepting-fall-2022-registrations/ danceLogic is a space where creativity lives in the arts and science, here young girls have endless possibilities PHILADELPHIA, PA, USA, September 21, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — West Park People’s Cultural Center danceLogic program is back this fall and taking registrations! This unique program combines the art of dance and computer coding, where girls ages 10-10 […]]]>

danceLogic is a space where creativity lives in the arts and science, here young girls have endless possibilities

PHILADELPHIA, PA, USA, September 21, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — West Park People’s Cultural Center danceLogic program is back this fall and taking registrations! This unique program combines the art of dance and computer coding, where girls ages 10-10 learn industry-standard coding that inspires dance choreography. danceLogic inspires girls, young women, and especially women of color to explore the world of STEAM. Students learn the mechanics of choreography and coding, leading to their development of original dance performances. As the girls demonstrate their coding skills, they move on to more advanced programming levels and projects, including advanced coding languages ​​like Python, C++, Java, and HTML, to build websites. Only 25% of those involved in coding are women, and danceLogic is making a big push to ensure a growing minority female footprint in this industry.

The danceLogic program is led by dance teachers Cameron Bridges and Natasha Truitt, who team up with coding teachers Devon Gooden and Franklyn Athias. Every Saturday, an hour and a half is devoted to dancing, followed by an hour of code. Both coding and dance function as forms of creation that use repetition and collaboration to produce works. Girls start associating repetitive actions in dance with steps that you have to code. With various incentives throughout the year, such as field trips and the chance to receive a free iPad, students must be engaged and willing to work hard. Our goal is to give girls a sense of agency and autonomy in STEAM, to combine the necessity of arts and sciences.

West Park is experiencing growing interest in danceLogic, especially after its appearance on CBS This Morning and its coverage in numerous print articles. To advance and expand danceLogic to meet demand, increased funding through individual donors, grants and sponsorships is needed. The organization maintains a policy of never turning away a child for financial reasons, making accessibility a priority.

To register or find out more, go to: www.westparkcultural.org/dancelogic

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About West Park Cultural Center
The West Park Cultural Center promotes a thriving West Park community by using arts and culture as a central tool in programs that help young people tap into their creative and academic potential and where residents can access the arts, education and other support programs that contribute to their personal lives. development.

Niesha Kennedy
West Park Cultural Center
+1 2156027295
write to us here

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SOMArts Cultural Center: SF Skate Club Presents ‘Push It Forward 5’ Fundraiser https://shul21.org/somarts-cultural-center-sf-skate-club-presents-push-it-forward-5-fundraiser/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://shul21.org/somarts-cultural-center-sf-skate-club-presents-push-it-forward-5-fundraiser/ The San Francisco Skate Club is proud to present Push it Forward 5, a fundraising art exhibit to benefit EduSkate, an after-school and youth outreach program that harnesses the creativity and unifying power of skateboarding to provide educational and transformative experiences for young people. The folk art auction and fundraiser […]]]>


The San Francisco Skate Club is proud to present Push it Forward 5, a fundraising art exhibit to benefit EduSkate, an after-school and youth outreach program that harnesses the creativity and unifying power of skateboarding to provide educational and transformative experiences for young people.

The folk art auction and fundraiser went on hiatus after 2019, due to the pandemic and the passing of beloved SF Skate Club co-founder Thuy Nguyen. This fifth edition marks a recommitment to Thuy’s enduring legacy, as well as celebrating the important role SF Skate Club has played in the community for over a decade. Push It Forward has grown considerably and this year the event will take place over a day and a half at SOMArts.

The Silent Art Auction features new and original works on skateboard decks from over 50 emerging and established artists, most of whom are rooted in contemporary street art and the skateboarding subculture. Art lovers and philanthropic participants will have the opportunity to bid on art, as well as other generous giveaways from skate companies and local businesses.

Event details

Friday, September 16: VIP Preview and Early Bird Bidding Party (hosted by the EduSkate Advisory Board) 5:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. SOMArts, 934 Brannan Street VIP tickets are $100 and include special musical performances by the musician SF Tim Cohen*, Limited Edition “Push It Forward 5” giveaway bags and the opportunity to purchase artwork at “buy it now prices” while enjoying drinks and appetizers from local vendors.

Buy your tickets here: https://sanfranciscoeduskate-bloom.kindful.com/e/pif5

*Tim Cohen is a musician and visual artist based in San Francisco. He has released solo albums under various aliases and performed in a variety of acts including The Fresh & Onlys, Black Fiction, 3 Leafs, Amocoma, Sonny & The Sunsets, Hattattak, The Latter and The Forest Fires Collective. He is a recognized figurehead in San Francisco’s indie garage and psychedelic rock scenes.

Saturday, September 17: EduSkate “Push It Forward 5” Fundraiser, Artwork Auction and Film Debut 2:00 – 6:00 p.m. SOMArts, 934 Brannan St. Suggested $5 donation at the door / No one turned up hijacked due to lack of funds Enjoy delicious pizza from Outta Sight Pizza, beer and wine, an original EduSkate youth video debut, raffle prizes and amazing artwork, all available to bid while listening to the beats from the turntables of the Local DJ Art is Life.

Silent Auction artists include: Aaron de la Cruz, Alicia McCarthy, Amanda N. Simons and Lindsay PB Jones, Andrew Schoultz, Apexer, BadSean, Brainsplosion, Bud Snow, Cathy Liu, Clautopias, Conor Buckley, Crystal Vielula, Dennis Brown, Eric Lister, Ferris Plock, Isabella Norwood-Paulus, Jackie Brown (Jackfacekillah), Jesse California, Jonathan Gregg, Julian Prince Dash, Justin Hager, Kristie Hansen, Kristin Fialko, Kristin Farr, Kristine Reano, Matthew Bajda, Michelle” Meng” Nguyen, Michael Kershnar, Oliva Oliver, Paul Norman, Paul Urich, Rafael Colon, Rebecca Kaufman, Richard Colman, Rye Purvis, Sean Newport, Steve Strand, Sunny Angulo, Taylove, Theodore Maider, Tod the Bunny, Tuned Out Design, Victor Reyes… and many more Continued!

All money raised – at the door, at the bar, for art – will go directly to keeping our EduSkate programming open and accessible to young people in San Francisco.

EduSkate is a program funded by Social and Environmental Entrepreneurs, a 501(c)3 non-profit organization. Your donations are 100% tax deductible. If you cannot attend, please consider making a donation by visiting the SF Skate Club website.

Learn more about EduSkate:

– at the SF Skate Club – https://www.sfskateclub.com/eduskate

– at Social and Environmental Entrepreneurs – http://saveourplanet.org/projects/eduskate/

Learn more about SOMarts: https://somarts.org/

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Students are concerned about the resources of the cultural center https://shul21.org/students-are-concerned-about-the-resources-of-the-cultural-center/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 10:01:00 +0000 https://shul21.org/students-are-concerned-about-the-resources-of-the-cultural-center/ ]]>

Archive photo / The daily campus

Nearly 40 students gathered on the second floor of the Students’ Union on Wednesday night to voice their concerns about the recent treatment of UConn’s cultural centers and cultural programs.

The meeting was moderated by Mason Holland, the current student body president and a seventh semester political science student. Holland, among other students, has raised concerns about funding and the availability of student staff positions at cultural centers.

“Why is this year different from last year? Because we can’t deny the fact that it is,” Holland told the band.

Representatives from several cultural centers, undergraduate student government, the Daily Campus and the UConn student activist group UNCHAIN ​​were present.

The students discussed their discomfort with recent visits by Acting President Radenka Maric. Maric has been criticized in the past by student activist groups for her stance on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Late Wednesday night, the Office of Diversity and Inclusion released a statement about the rumored budget cuts.

“First, cultural centers are NOT ‘funded’ and their budgets have NOT been cut,” the statement said.

The statement, which is signed by UConn’s director of diversity, Dr Frank Tuitt, said some of the excess funding from ODI’s operating budget had been used to support cultural centers and programs.

“Over the past few years, ODI has been able to support the programming and staffing of PRLACC, NACP and MECP using unspent funds from our operating budget,” the statement read.

“This year, to maintain our commitment to support Native American Cultural Programs (NACP) and Middle Eastern Cultural Programs (MECP), ODI has made the decision to redistribute a portion of funding intended for Cultural Centers to support this priority.”

ODI did not dispute that this resulted in budgetary changes for some organisations.

“As a result of this decision, each of the cultural centers will have a slightly lower operating budget for this academic year than last year,” the statement read.

When asked to comment, the university responded with the ODI statement.

Holland said regardless of the circumstances of the budget changes, students should keep talking about cultural centers.

“You have the right to ask for more,” Holland said.

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How the Diamante Arts & Cultural Center shines a light on Latino culture :: WRAL.com https://shul21.org/how-the-diamante-arts-cultural-center-shines-a-light-on-latino-culture-wral-com/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 21:00:14 +0000 https://shul21.org/how-the-diamante-arts-cultural-center-shines-a-light-on-latino-culture-wral-com/ This article was written on behalf of our sponsor, Whitley Law Firm. The Diamante Arts & Cultural Center is one of North Carolina’s most important cultural institutions. The center’s executive director, Lizette Cruz Watko, founded it to showcase the diversity of the Latino community in North Carolina. The center offers classes, lectures, documentary screenings, movie […]]]>

This article was written on behalf of our sponsor, Whitley Law Firm.

The Diamante Arts & Cultural Center is one of North Carolina’s most important cultural institutions. The center’s executive director, Lizette Cruz Watko, founded it to showcase the diversity of the Latino community in North Carolina. The center offers classes, lectures, documentary screenings, movie nights, and various other programs that celebrate Latino culture. Having existed for 27 years, the organization began when there was only a small Latin American population in the state; now it totals over 1 million people.

As North Carolina’s oldest Latino arts and culture institution, Diamante is designed to explore the diversity of the Latino community. The organization began with awards created to recognize achievement within North Carolina’s Latino community. The awards are unique as it is a public nomination process with awards in the areas of art and culture, education, business, community engagement, health and science, and defense of Latinos. This award hopes to showcase community to eradicate some misconceptions about community. In addition to these six awards, the center awards a prize to young people, based on their involvement in the community, and there is also a lifetime achievement award.

The center’s mission is to “preserve the Latin American experience and advance understanding of Latin American art and culture,” Watko said. To that end, the center hosts many events throughout the year that celebrate different aspects of Latino culture. The Three Kings Parade is one of the oldest in the country and one of the oldest events in the center where you can experience the diversity of the Latin American community while helping families in need.

Another popular event at the Diamante Arts & Cultural Center is the Ritmo Latino Festival. This event celebrates all aspects of Latino culture, from music and dance to food and art. The festival also features several vendors selling traditional Latin American crafts and products. The Diamante Arts & Cultural Center also has a gallery that features works by Latino artists from North Carolina. The gallery is open to the public and everyone is free to enter and see the works on display and to visit the studios of working artists.

Cultivate the arts in the community

The Diamante arts and culture center also offers courses and workshops. For children, these classes help foster a love of the arts and provide them with positive role models. “The community response to these opportunities has been wonderful,” Watko said. “We’ve always had the support of the community at large.”

With only two part-time employees, the Diamante Arts & Cultural Center relies heavily on donations and volunteers. As one of their main supporters, Raleigh-based Whitley Law Firm is excited to see the growth of the arts and culture hub. “As our Hispanic community grows in North Carolina, we wanted to be involved with an organization that truly promotes Hispanic culture. As people move around the state, especially if they immigrate, they’ve lost that feeling of being at home,” Ben says Whitley. “Within any immigrant population, there is usually mistrust or misunderstanding of institutions. Law firms and the legal system can be intimidating and inaccessible institutions. By supporting an organization that promotes culture and community, we want to show the Hispanic community that we support them in a sustainable way. »
“We’re trying to fulfill a community dream,” Watko added. If you would like to consider making a donation to the Diamante Center for Art and Culture, donations go to the different programs they offer and help keep the lights on and the doors open.

This article was written on behalf of our sponsor, Whitley Law Firm.

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Cultural significance of the Black Cultural Center | New https://shul21.org/cultural-significance-of-the-black-cultural-center-new/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 22:30:00 +0000 https://shul21.org/cultural-significance-of-the-black-cultural-center-new/ Brilliance, Courage, Determination, Excellence, Resilience, Joy, Family, Community, Scholarship, Leadership, and Pride are the values ​​Texas Tech’s first Black Cultural Center intends to uphold. Opened September 9, the cultural center is located at 2533 15th Street. The center is seen as a safe space or sanctuary for all races to recognize diversity and bring people […]]]>

Brilliance, Courage, Determination, Excellence, Resilience, Joy, Family, Community, Scholarship, Leadership, and Pride are the values ​​Texas Tech’s first Black Cultural Center intends to uphold.

Opened September 9, the cultural center is located at 2533 15th Street. The center is seen as a safe space or sanctuary for all races to recognize diversity and bring people together for learning and the exchange of ideas according to Dr. Carol Sumner, the Division’s vice president of program diversity, equity and inclusion.

The Black Cultural Center is the first of its kind at Tech, but it’s also very important for a public university, according to Black Student Association (BSA) President Christianah Adejokun.

“One thing I would like to say is that this culture, this center, will be the beginning of creating a culture of mutual understanding,” Adejokun said. “As an individual from Arlington, Texas and the daughter of two Nigerian-born immigrants, it’s important to me to be able to see this happening on campus, to see representation and change happening on campus.”

For Tech graduate Cora Robinson, the opening of the cultural center marks a significant step forward in the history of Tech. Robinson served as the former president of the Student Organization for Black Unity (SOBU) while at Tech.

“When I was on campus, I was president of the Black Student Union,” Robinson said. “We had people who were advocates and people who were allies, but to see something like this, where so many people came to pool their resources to create this, (Black Cultural Center) if you had told me that in 1979, I would have said, “No, that could never happen at Texas Tech University”.

Additionally, Robinson said Tech’s diversity efforts differ significantly from her time on campus, which makes her proud of the progress made so far.

“Having a diversity director is beyond me, and it makes me really proud to come from Red Raiders heritage,” Robinson said. “It’s amazing. I was here in the late 70s and there weren’t so many allies and not so many partners back then. But to see all these people coming together, working together to create I’m in heaven with this installation, I think it’s fabulous.

Alumni Mythe Kirven said the center will continue to foster a safe space for African American students as they continue their legacy at Tech.

“When I was here over 45 years ago, we didn’t have that,” Kirven said. “Culture is so important to students. I’m so happy to be a part of it, to see it come to fruition. This should have been done years ago.

Roland Spotts, a third-year history student from Alvarado, said the Black Cultural Center is a way for individuals to gain proper knowledge about African American culture.

“It’s nice to finally have something where you can see yourself and be represented,” Spotts said. “It’s nice to see yourself portrayed in a different light than what, say, the mainstream media likes to portray African Americans.”

While working on the construction of the building, Michael Ducote, a freshman valedictorian with the Advisory Committee on Student Retention and Achievement (CARS) in Odessa, said he was inspired to return to the school and receive an education at Tech.

“I wanted to shake their (the student’s) hand and say thank you for having this dream,” Ducote said.

Concluding the grand opening ceremony, Sumner invited the public to enter the Black Cultural Center.

“Together, we celebrate this historic day with the opening of our Black Cultural Center at Texas Tech University,” Sumner said. “As you enter this space for the first time, don’t let it be the last.”

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Fresno Cultural Center gets $7.4 million to show Latin art https://shul21.org/fresno-cultural-center-gets-7-4-million-to-show-latin-art/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://shul21.org/fresno-cultural-center-gets-7-4-million-to-show-latin-art/ Mariachi Centinela performed at the Gala de Cala celebration on October 30, 2021 at Arte Américas. JUAN ESPARZA LOERA Arte Américas, the only Latino cultural arts center in the Central San Joaquin Valley, had to temporarily close during the pandemic and was extensively vandalized. During its closure, the center had its windows smashed, its air […]]]>

Mariachi Centinela performed at the Gala de Cala celebration on October 30, 2021 at Arte Américas.

Mariachi Centinela performed at the Gala de Cala celebration on October 30, 2021 at Arte Américas.

Arte Américas, the only Latino cultural arts center in the Central San Joaquin Valley, had to temporarily close during the pandemic and was extensively vandalized.

During its closure, the center had its windows smashed, its air conditioning system destroyed, its exterior electrical wiring cut and experienced two intrusion situations through its roof.

“It was just a really, really tough time for us,” said Ruth Saludes, executive director of Arte Américas.

After reopening — and having to pay for repairs — the art gallery and cultural center is now receiving a new wave of public investment from state and local governments.

Assemblyman Dr. Joaquin Arambula presented a check for $7 million to Arte Américas Wednesday morning in downtown Fresno. The funding is expected to help with renovations and expansion of the program, with the goal of helping the facility become a world-class museum and cultural center.

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Assemblyman Dr. Joaquin Arambula presented Arte Américas with a check for $7 million to support repairs and growth of the art gallery and cultural center on September 7, 2022. Board members Municipal of Fresno Miguel Arias (far left) and Nelson Esparza (far right) joined Arambula and Arte Américas founders and board members for a photo. LAURA S.DIAZ ldiaz@fresnobee.com

In addition to state funding, Fresno City Councilman Miguel Arias said the city has provided an additional $400,000 to help with building improvements.

The infrastructure damage “threatened the vitality of this building and what it represents,” Arias said.

Vivian Velasco Paz, chair of the board of directors of Arte Américas, said the funding would have an impact beyond the building’s infrastructure.

“The community will be the true beneficiaries of these funds,” she said. “More children are going to discover art here, and the wonderful thing about Arte Américas is that it brings together several generations.”

Latino cultural arts center plans to expand

Since its founding 35 years ago, keeping Arte Américas open has “always been a financial struggle,” Saludes said.

It has managed to stay afloat through a series of grants, public and private donations, volunteer staff and, most recently, a $5 gallery entry fee which is waived on free access days. .

“A lot of museums and galleries have closed (during the pandemic). We didn’t,” Saludes said. “We worked very hard over the last three years to make sure we were stable.”

Arte Américas executives hope the latest funding injection will help keep the center open and vibrant in the future.

The center currently uses a third of its building, and Arte Américas staff want to make more use of the facility’s space to expand its offering of arts and cultural programming.


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Beyond repairing damage sustained during the pandemic, the funds will help cover the costs of much-needed repairs to the second floor. The second floor was used years ago but is no longer operational, Saludes said. It needs new floors, updated bathrooms and an updated kitchen, she said.

Arte Américas also plans to invest in temperature control and security systems.

The funds will also help pay the property’s mortgage. Previously, retired judge and founder of Arte Américas, Armando Rodriguez, helped pay the center’s monthly fees when he struggled financially.

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A 17-foot tall version of La Catrina was a hit during the Cala Gala celebration at Arte Américas on October 30, 2021. JUAN ESPARZA LOERA

“We actually own all of this property. It’s not a rental,” Saludes said. “And we almost completely paid off (the mortgage). It won’t be very long. And of course, now it will be easy to pay it back.

The funds granted will also enable Arte Américas to hire five new staff members. Currently, Saludes and a program manager are the only two full-time employees and there are a few part-time workers.

Saludes said new job descriptions have not yet been drafted because Arte Américas wants to assess which areas could most benefit the center and the community.

The gallery aims to make the Fresno community “stronger”

In Riverside, the Cheech Marin Center for Chicano Art & Culture received a $9.7 million grant of the State to support its development. It opened earlier this summer.

Seeing how cultural centers in other cities were receiving grants worth millions of dollars, Arambula requested a similar amount for Arte Américas, Velsaco Paz said.

Arambula secured $21.5 million in public funds to pour into various local agencies and nonprofits in District 31, including the $7 million for Arte Américas, according to his office.

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Assemblyman Dr. Joaquin Arambula presented Arte Américas with a check for $7 million to support repairs and growth of the art gallery and cultural center on September 7, 2022. Board members Municipal of Fresno Miguel Arias (far left) and Nelson Esparza (far right) joined Arambula and Arte Américas founders and board members for a photo. LAURA S.DIAZ ldiaz@fresnobee.com

“We need to be able to celebrate that our diversity is our strength,” Arambula said. “By examining our culture and understanding how we can express ourselves in art, we can be a stronger community.”

This has always been the center’s mission, said members of the Arte Américas board of directors.

“When we started Arte Américas, we knew it was important because we knew Fresno was changing,” said Lilia Gonzáles-Chávez, one of the founders of Arte Américas. “We needed to provide a place where children could see themselves in the most positive light possible.”

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Mulva Cultural Center aims to be a Midwest beacon for creativity https://shul21.org/mulva-cultural-center-aims-to-be-a-midwest-beacon-for-creativity/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 16:22:30 +0000 https://shul21.org/mulva-cultural-center-aims-to-be-a-midwest-beacon-for-creativity/ BY LEE REINSCHCORRESPONDING OF FATHER-October in Wisconsin is usually the time of year to batten down hatches and put up storm windows. From mid-October to late October, at the junction of Broadway and Main Avenue, the glass panels will hang at the future Mulva Cultural Center. The 75,000-square-foot facility, which aims to be “a premier […]]]>

BY LEE REINSCH
CORRESPONDING


OF FATHER
-October in Wisconsin is usually the time of year to batten down hatches and put up storm windows.

From mid-October to late October, at the junction of Broadway and Main Avenue, the glass panels will hang at the future Mulva Cultural Center.

The 75,000-square-foot facility, which aims to be “a premier institution for civic and creative engagement in the Midwest,” is more than halfway to the finishing mark.

“The project is on time and on budget,” said Mulva Cultural Center CEO Mike Van Asten.
The $95 million facility, which began in August 2021, is expected to open next summer.

“Right now the teams are applying the stone elements on the facade,” he said.

Drawing inspiration from the natural surroundings – the river and boulders that sit just outside its windows near the east bank of the Fox River – the building’s palette will consist of stone, timber, lots of glass and neutral metals.

Once the large windows have been installed and the building has been sealed off from the outside elements, the finishing work can begin inside.

That’s when the fun can begin.

Van Asten had just finished choosing the equipment for the kitchen and was considering furniture options.

“The staffing table for the organization is complete, so I am in the process of hiring the management team,” he said. “No surprise, I’m being pulled in many directions.”

Lantern on the river
The pinnacle of all this preparation will occur once the construction crews return home and the lights come on.

The structure will be lit from within, evoking “a lantern on the river”.

Founders and philanthropists James and Miriam Mulva want this two-story lighthouse to be a fixture of the community, illuminating in more ways than one.

Rising from the east bank of the Fox River at the intersection of Broadway and Main Avenue, the Mulva Cultural Center is on budget for completion next year. Photo courtesy of Leonard & Finco

They would love to see educational programs for young and old held in classrooms and gathering spaces, documentaries shown in the 200-seat theatre/auditorium, and an ever-changing range of art exhibits and exhibitions of photographs featured in the gallery.

“Programming, from traveling exhibitions to art/photography performances to documentaries for the theater, is critical to the center’s success,” Van Asten said.

When the Mulvas announced their intention to commit to providing the city with a cultural center three years ago, James Mulva said that having hired an architectural firm such as SOM (Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, LLP of Chicago) showed “how much this project means to the town of De Pere and the people of northeastern Wisconsin, and highlights our family’s longstanding commitment to improving the community that my wife Miriam and I know and love since our childhood.

Mulva called the addition of the addition to the historic downtown core of De Pere a grand plan that was part of the new De Pere Cultural District Master Plan.

He said they were “honoured and delighted” to partner with the company on the project.

What’s inside
The entrance to the Mulva Cultural Center will lead to an open glass atrium, which will make the most of the outdoors during the day, while attracting the guest.

A specialty restaurant on the first floor will be open six days a week, and next door, a large gift shop.
Visitors can have a coffee in the cafe in the center and, if the weather is nice, take it outside on the panoramic terrace overlooking the river.

Fortunately, there have been no major or unpleasant surprises so far, Van Asten said.

“SOM is a detail-oriented architecture firm; Mortenson (construction company MA Mortenson Company of Minneapolis) has built projects of this scale before,” Van Asten said.

Another project on the to-do list is to become accredited with the American Alliance of Museums, a national organization that has been around since 1906 and requires member museums to meet a set of quality and ethical standards.

Van Asten served as development chair and board member of the Milwaukee Public Museum and is chairman of the board of trustees at Bellin College.

He founded Incredible Edibles, the parent company of Liberty Banquet Hall and Conference Center in Kimberly in 1981, so he has a proven track record in the hotel and restaurant business.

He is also a board member of the Fox Cities Convention & Visitors Bureau and an alumnus of St. Norbert College, where he majored in economics and business administration.

“It’s great to see the momentum from De Pere,” said Van Asten. “I am honored to be part of the growth of downtown.”

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Cultural center project plans to move forward despite expiration of agreement | New https://shul21.org/cultural-center-project-plans-to-move-forward-despite-expiration-of-agreement-new/ Mon, 29 Aug 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://shul21.org/cultural-center-project-plans-to-move-forward-despite-expiration-of-agreement-new/ With a deadline passed at the end of July, the Henry County Cultural Center (CCHC) is in breach of its purchase agreement with the Napoleon Area City Schools District, but the organization plans to move from the front with the renovation of the former Napoleon Middle School/Central Elementary School property into a cultural center. According […]]]>

With a deadline passed at the end of July, the Henry County Cultural Center (CCHC) is in breach of its purchase agreement with the Napoleon Area City Schools District, but the organization plans to move from the front with the renovation of the former Napoleon Middle School/Central Elementary School property into a cultural center.

According to Napoleon City Manager Joel Mazur, the deadline for the body to file a Certificate of Opportunity for the demolition of the building was July 28 and the city has not received such a request.

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Home of the Alton Symphony Orchestra at the Hatheway Cultural Center https://shul21.org/home-of-the-alton-symphony-orchestra-at-the-hatheway-cultural-center/ Sat, 27 Aug 2022 18:58:54 +0000 https://shul21.org/home-of-the-alton-symphony-orchestra-at-the-hatheway-cultural-center/ ALTON – The Alton Symphony Orchestra (ASO) is set to open its 78th concert season, with Maestro Wm. Shane Williams once again leading the musicians as they share the beauty of music with all. Tickets will not be mailed. Instead, all tickets will be available at “Will-call” on the day of the concert. The first […]]]>

ALTON – The Alton Symphony Orchestra (ASO) is set to open its 78th concert season, with Maestro Wm. Shane Williams once again leading the musicians as they share the beauty of music with all.

Tickets will not be mailed. Instead, all tickets will be available at “Will-call” on the day of the concert.

The first concert of the season is “Celebrating the Greats: Beethoven, Gershwin, and Williams” at 7 p.m. on Saturday, October 22. Followed by “Ride, Rhythm and Razzle-Dazzle,” at 7 p.m. Saturday, December 10. “An Afternoon of Spanish Dance, Delight and, in 2023, Despair” at 3 p.m. on Sunday February 26 and “An Evening with the Masters” at 7 p.m. on Saturday April 29. All concerts are given at the Alton Symphony Orchestra’s home venue, the Hatheway Cultural Center, at Lewis and Clark Community College, 5800 Godfrey Road, Godfrey.

Portions of this season’s programming for the nonprofit arts organization are funded by generous donations from the Alton Foundation, the Jacoby Foundation, the Alton Community Service League and a grant from the Arts Council of the United States. ‘Illinois.

“After being online last season, I love seeing patrons sit down before a concert again,” ASO President Jessica Poddig said in February during the orchestra’s first season in person. since the start of the pandemic “I’ve had many conversations with people telling me how happy they were to be able to see us in person again.”

Poddig said her first year as board chair was excellent.

Tickets and more information are available at www.altonsymphonyorchestra.org or email altonsymphony@gmail.com.

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Mosaic Templars Cultural Center Receives $250,000 Renovation Grant | KTVE https://shul21.org/mosaic-templars-cultural-center-receives-250000-renovation-grant-ktve/ Sat, 27 Aug 2022 02:53:51 +0000 https://shul21.org/mosaic-templars-cultural-center-receives-250000-renovation-grant-ktve/ LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – Little Rock’s Mosaic Templars Cultural Center announced some good news earlier this week in the form of a $250,000 grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services. The grant will be used for phase two of the center’s renovation project, specifically a redesign of the center’s permanent exhibit interpreting the […]]]>

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – Little Rock’s Mosaic Templars Cultural Center announced some good news earlier this week in the form of a $250,000 grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

The grant will be used for phase two of the center’s renovation project, specifically a redesign of the center’s permanent exhibit interpreting the African-American experience in Arkansas, as well as the development of new education and training programs. sensitization.

“The Mosaic Templars Cultural Center is essential to telling the African-American history and culture of Arkansas,” said Stacy Hurst, secretary of the Arkansas Department of Parks, Heritage and Tourism. “The grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services will help the Center reach more people with phase two of its renovation project, bolstering the center’s outreach and education efforts.”

The Institute of Museum and Library Services is a federal agency responsible for supporting museums, libraries, and related organizations.

The center takes its name from the Mosaic Templars of America, a black fraternal organization founded in Little Rock in 1883. Its headquarters was the building at West Ninth and Broadway streets that now houses the center.

“In 2023, the Mosaic Templars of America celebrates its 140th anniversary,” said Jimmy Bryant, director of Arkansas Heritage. “This grant will help the Mosaic Templars Cultural Center preserve its legacy, continuing to educate and inform Arkansans about the history of our state’s African American community.”

The renovation is expected to be completed in 2023.

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