Cultural center – Shul 21 http://shul21.org/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 04:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://shul21.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-17-120x120.png Cultural center – Shul 21 http://shul21.org/ 32 32 County Commissioners Recognize Cultural Center https://shul21.org/county-commissioners-recognize-cultural-center/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://shul21.org/county-commissioners-recognize-cultural-center/ As a landmark accolade, the First Coast Cultural Center was recently recognized by St. Johns County Commissioners, who honored the services, classes, and outreach programs the nonprofit organization has provided locally for 27 years with a successful track record. Mention of an innovative program, Kick StART, an after-school arts enrichment program in 2020 during COVID […]]]>

As a landmark accolade, the First Coast Cultural Center was recently recognized by St. Johns County Commissioners, who honored the services, classes, and outreach programs the nonprofit organization has provided locally for 27 years with a successful track record.

Mention of an innovative program, Kick StART, an after-school arts enrichment program in 2020 during COVID 19, received unique accolades.

The First Coast Cultural Center received the Certificate of Recognition at the June 7 Commissioners meeting. Commissioner Jeremiah Blocker presented the award. On hand to receive the award were Joe Bryant, Chairman of the Board of the First Coast Cultural Center, and Donna Guzzo, President and Executive Director of the First Coast Cultural Center.

Guzzo shared his overarching philosophy on the success of the Cultural Center with the statement, “Success is imminent!”

The First Coast Cultural Center is a place for creating, understanding and experiencing the arts. The organization achieves its goals through exhibitions of local, regional and national artists in a variety of media through educational and invigorating events, arts classes, lectures and workshops.


Key programs include Sound Connections Music Therapy for Children with Disabilities, which is offered free to students in St. Johns County schools and Title I schools that provide additional resources to economically disadvantaged students. Additionally, Kick Start after-school arts enrichment programs and services are available.

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Filipino Canadians launch campaign for future PH Cultural Center https://shul21.org/filipino-canadians-launch-campaign-for-future-ph-cultural-center/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 00:45:00 +0000 https://shul21.org/filipino-canadians-launch-campaign-for-future-ph-cultural-center/ A colorful parade of various Filipino groups kicked off the 124th anniversary celebration of Philippine Independence Day in Vancouver. The celebration was made more special with the official launch of a bayanihan campaign to help build a Filipino cultural center in Vancouver. The project is led by the Mabuhay House Society, a non-profit organization made […]]]>

A colorful parade of various Filipino groups kicked off the 124th anniversary celebration of Philippine Independence Day in Vancouver.

The celebration was made more special with the official launch of a bayanihan campaign to help build a Filipino cultural center in Vancouver. The project is led by the Mabuhay House Society, a non-profit organization made up of young Filipino Canadians.

“Panahon na [It’s time] really come together to work towards realizing this dream of ours and show elected officials, other supporters and advocates that we need their help to make this a reality,” said Maita Santiago of the Mabuhay House Society.

Santiago said his dream was to have a multipurpose center where local celebrations and cultural performances, among other gatherings, could take place.

“We envision a cross-cultural, open and inclusive welcome center that is also a home. A place where we can come together to do everything from your local celebration to your group gathering, from cultural performances to childcare, hopefully, to housing.”

Portliving CEO Macario ‘Tobi’ Reyes said he would provide the space for the Philippine center on a property his company is developing. He added that if they are able to get all the permits, they could start construction within the next two years. Reyes hopes the centre, which will be at least 30,000 square feet in size, will help connect Vancouver-born Filipinos to their heritage.

“I hope it will do for them what Canada has done for me in general. Which is to give them a way to grow in the community and enjoy their lives in a different way than they probably would have imagined without the Filipino center,” Reyes said.

Philippine Consul General Maria Andrelita Austria, a member of the society’s advisory board, also hopes the center will ensure young Filipinos stay connected to their roots.

“We would like the younger generation to be in touch with their roots and engage in activities in the community,” she said.

The construction of a Filipino community center in Metro Vancouver has had its share of controversy since the 1980s. Community leader Salve Dayao, who was among those raising funds in 1986, said that this money was gone.

Dayao hope, “yung in the past, makuha yun, ma-retrieve yong pera na yun, makatulong dito sa ginagawa ng mga kabataan [what happened in the past, we’ll be able to get it back, we’ll be able to retrieve the money, so it can help the project of these young people].”

For his part, Mable Elmore, Member of the Legislative Assembly of British Columbia, assured the community that there will be more transparency this time around. The Philippine legislator actively supported the new initiative.

“You’ve seen our board members in terms of the integrity of the people involved, as well as expectations around reporting, financial accountability, transparency. We have accountants and I’m very Glad the Filipino Accountants Association came forward and volunteered to help us. I’m really going to ask the community to support us at all levels,” Elmore said.

Federal, provincial and municipal officials who attended the celebration have already shown their support for the proposed Philippine cultural center.

Filipino Canadians, Filipino community, Filipino cultural center, Filipino workers abroad, immigrants, Vancouver, TFC News

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cultural center announces a line of credit | https://shul21.org/cultural-center-announces-a-line-of-credit/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://shul21.org/cultural-center-announces-a-line-of-credit/ With the offer of a $1 million line of credit and a change in management, the Henry County Cultural Center Board of Directors is once again preparing to seek an extension for a renovation project whose deadline is today. The Henry County Cultural Center (CCHC), formerly the Napoleon Civic Center Foundation, has purchased the former […]]]>

With the offer of a $1 million line of credit and a change in management, the Henry County Cultural Center Board of Directors is once again preparing to seek an extension for a renovation project whose deadline is today.

The Henry County Cultural Center (CCHC), formerly the Napoleon Civic Center Foundation, has purchased the former Napoleon Middle School/Central Elementary School property with the intention of renovating it once the facilities project of the school district was completed and the buildings were no longer used by the district. Part of the purchase agreement with the school district included a clause that, after five years, all parts of the building that did not have a certificate of occupancy would be subject to demolition. An anonymous donor pledged the $547,000 to an escrow account that was set up to cover demolition expenses if needed, but those funds cannot be used for other parts of the project.

The five-year deadline expires today and the nonprofit continues to fundraise for the project but has not started renovations. The cultural center group had requested a two-year extension of the current agreement from the Napoleon Area Schools Board of Education and no action was taken on the request, with a communication from the district indicating that the terms of the contract will remain in effect.

At Monday’s CCHC meeting, Board Vice Chair Patty Wiemken announced that the cultural center had been offered a secured line of credit of up to $1 million from Henry County Bank, to use as needed. Along with the money, pledges, and band grant, this brings the band’s funds to $1.5 million. This still falls short of the most recent renovation estimate for all of the old school except for the east section (the old high school) at $3.1 million.

“With those numbers in mind, we don’t know if it’s enough for the school board to give us an extension because they said we needed to have a significant amount of cash on hand,” Wiemken said. “The bank considers all of our pledges to be cash in hand when supporting it for us.”

Board member Gary Westhoven said he hoped the $1 million line of credit would spark more interest in donating to the project.

“That’s why we were asking for an extension, because it just takes time for people to get their money and their finances where they can,” added Wiemken.

There was also talk of a potential brownfields remediation grant that Napoleon’s city had previously submitted an application for that would use state funding, with a match from the city, to demolish the building. In this scenario, the city would then become the owner of the land and the blocked funds would be returned to the donor. While an agreement had already been reached with the cultural center and the city, the cultural center recently decided to withdraw from the agreement, stating that the majority of voting members are “more interested in restoration than demolition”. and a desire to use all of his available time for fundraising rather than “being locked into demolition.” Last week, City Manager Joel Mazur said the cultural center had asked the city to wait to withdraw the application until the school board’s deadline, so the city would wait until June 15.

The CCHC board previously voted to table the issue of the grant and no action was taken Monday night.

“Since he demolished everything (the building), we were just hesitant to accept that,” Wiemken said.

Wiemken and Westhoven said the council was ready to explore other options with the town – Wiemken adding that one suggestion could be to keep the theater and demolish the rest of the building and the town could have the rest of the land.

“It seems like nothing we’ve explored with the city leaves us with a building,” Westhoven added.

Wiemken will contact the school district to reinitiate discussions regarding a possible extension.

Steve Busch asked if council is prepared, if an extension is not granted, to manage the demolition project.

“You have an offer for the city to take care of that,” Busch said, adding that it would take a long time. “If I was already sitting in your seat, it will just be, again, due diligence to understand that there’s a lot of value in that if the project ends up going in that direction.”

Wiemken said current board members would be responsible should it happen. Westhoven added that LJ Irving Demolition, which had provided the estimate of the amount in the escrow account and which is contracted to carry out the demolition if necessary, offered to keep the demolition price at or below the price originally offered.

After a nearly 1.5-hour closed session that began Monday’s meeting, Wiemken announced that the board has removed Chairman Jeffrey Tonjes from the board, effective immediately.

After the meeting, Wiemken declined to comment further on the decision.

“He did a lot of work for us,” she said. “It was a tough decision.”

Wiemken will serve as interim chairman until further action is taken by the board.

“I am so disappointed in this vote as I have spent many sleepless nights, years and hours to help fulfill the legacy of my mentor, Ken Neuenschwander, but those who know me know that I am a big dreamer, I’m also a realist,” Tonjes said after the meeting. “At the end of my presidency, I was trying to steer CCHC toward a plan B that would protect our angel donor’s investment while ensuring that his money go to something positive for the benefit of the community other than demolishing this magnificent building if the CCHC does not succeed.

In other subjects:

• Wiemken announced that 2020 Molded Plastics has verbally committed monthly donations in an amount to be determined later upon completion of the renovation. “When we finish this project, they will commit to a monthly donation to make sure we can run smoothly… the maintenance bills to get it started,” she said.

•The board accepted Westhoven’s resignation from the board. He indicated that he would remain involved in the project.

•Schedule its next meeting for June 21 at 5:30 p.m. at the Emporium.

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Hispanic Cultural Center Files Ethics Complaint Against Lisa Sánchez of Boise https://shul21.org/hispanic-cultural-center-files-ethics-complaint-against-lisa-sanchez-of-boise/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 21:33:16 +0000 https://shul21.org/hispanic-cultural-center-files-ethics-complaint-against-lisa-sanchez-of-boise/ “I am grateful for the work of the City of Boise Ethics Commission,” Sánchez wrote in an email. “The parties and I have reached an agreement, and I now submit that the matter has been resolved.” What do the surveys say? Documents filed with the Ethics Commission indicate that Gomez donated a portrait she painted […]]]>

“I am grateful for the work of the City of Boise Ethics Commission,” Sánchez wrote in an email. “The parties and I have reached an agreement, and I now submit that the matter has been resolved.”

What do the surveys say?

Documents filed with the Ethics Commission indicate that Gomez donated a portrait she painted of Sánchez to the Hispanic Cultural Center in June 2021. Its estimated value is $2,000. Sanchez reportedly asked to borrow the portrait in August 2021 for a city council campaign fundraiser scheduled for September 16. The Hispanic Cultural Center says she has been approved to borrow the painting, but only on the condition that it be returned on September 17.

In March 2022, the Hispanic Cultural Center said Sanchez refused to return it “because she implied that since it is her image, she has the right to own it and felt that HCCI did not deserve the ‘have in their possession.’

In Gomez’s file with the city, she recalls reminding Sánchez that the painting belonged to the Hispanic Cultural Center and that permission from the organization was needed to keep the painting. Gomez says she told Sánchez to write a letter to the Hispanic Cultural Center explaining why she should be able to keep the painting, which Gomez would co-sign with her. But, when Gomez never received a letter to co-sign, she told the ethics committee she assumed the painting had been returned.

“In January 2022, I found out she still hadn’t returned the painting to the Hispanic Cultural Center,” Gomez wrote to the ethics commission.

Conclusions of the Ethics Commission

Boise’s code of ethics prevents officials from knowingly using his official position for financial gain, but the Hispanic Cultural Center and Gomez said Sánchez voluntarily lent the painting.

City ethics rules also prevent officials from accepting any gift of value from any person or company with an interest in city affairs. But, there is an exception for public servants who accept contributions and services in connection with a campaign. Since the painting was loaned for a campaign event, Sánchez’s activities fall within this exception.

The ethics commission also found there was “no basis” for the claim that the Hispanic Cultural Center is interested in doing business with the city, meaning that even if Sánchez was not campaigning , she could still accept gifts from the organization. The commission also concluded that there was no reason to claim that accepting gifts, if the painting could be considered a “precious gift”, from the Hispanic Cultural Center would impact Sánchez’s impartiality in as a politician.

“Again, the investigations do not appear to question the painting’s original loan to Sanchez,” the ethics commission wrote in its decision. “However, to the extent that the investigations claim the loan constituted a gift of value, the loan falls within the express campaign exception to the ban on gifts of value to city officials.”

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Turkey to create cultural center in Karachi, Pakistan https://shul21.org/turkey-to-create-cultural-center-in-karachi-pakistan/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 06:55:00 +0000 https://shul21.org/turkey-to-create-cultural-center-in-karachi-pakistan/ Pakistan’s commercial capital, Karachi, will soon have a Turkish cultural centre. The center, which will promote Turkish art, language, culture and history, will be established by the Yunus Emre Institute, an official statement said Monday. A Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) will soon be signed between the Turkish Consulate and the Karachi District Government, the statement […]]]>

Pakistan’s commercial capital, Karachi, will soon have a Turkish cultural centre. The center, which will promote Turkish art, language, culture and history, will be established by the Yunus Emre Institute, an official statement said Monday.

A Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) will soon be signed between the Turkish Consulate and the Karachi District Government, the statement added.

Turkish Consul General in Karachi Cemal Sangu and Karachi Commissioner Iqbal Memon recently visited the city’s historic Burns Garden, where the Yunus Emre Turkish Cultural Center is believed to be established. Speaking to Anadolu Agency (AA), Sangu said the two sides are finalizing the requirements for the establishment of the center. The center, he said, would not only help promote cultural activities in cities, but also provide opportunities for researchers, teachers and students to learn about Turkish history and culture.

Karachi will be the second Pakistani city after Lahore to have a Turkish cultural center.

Yunus Emre was a Turkish and Sufi folk poet who lived in Anatolia from the mid-13th century to the first quarter of the 14th century. The Yunus Emre Institute is a non-profit organization (NGO) founded in 2007 to promote Turkish culture, language and arts throughout the world. It has spread to 66 countries, signed agreements with more than 400 universities and issued 3.5 million Turkish language diplomas worldwide.

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Upcoming Dartmouth Cultural Center Summer Events https://shul21.org/upcoming-dartmouth-cultural-center-summer-events/ Sun, 05 Jun 2022 17:37:53 +0000 https://shul21.org/upcoming-dartmouth-cultural-center-summer-events/ The Dartmouth Cultural Center on Elm Street in South Dartmouth will feature two new art exhibitions during the months of June and July, as well as lectures and informative environmental programs. Pauline Santos, Chair of the Dartmouth Cultural Center Board of Trustees, and Gallery Director Jill Law joined town square sunday this week with details […]]]>

The Dartmouth Cultural Center on Elm Street in South Dartmouth will feature two new art exhibitions during the months of June and July, as well as lectures and informative environmental programs.

Pauline Santos, Chair of the Dartmouth Cultural Center Board of Trustees, and Gallery Director Jill Law joined town square sunday this week with details of upcoming programs.

One of the exhibits starts this week: paintings by local artist JP Powel. The exhibition is titled “Seasons”, with paintings depicting different seasons of the year.

“It’s a beautiful show,” Law said. “JP has been a Dartmouth resident since 1966 and has been painting ever since, and his work is realistic with a touch. Well worth a trip to see.”

Powel will also be participating in an Artist Talk on June 18 at 2 p.m. at the center.

Also in June and September, the center will host a series of Thursday night shows focusing on climate change. Programs begin June 23 with a speaker from the Urban Harbor Institute, followed by a speaker from NOAA on hurricanes in our area. You can find out more by visiting dartmouthculturalcenterinc.org or the the center’s Facebook page.

In July, Dartmouth artist Michael Morris will exhibit his photographs at the Dartmouth Cultural Center.

“Michael Morris is a fantastic photographer,” Law said. “He does a lot of drone imagery as well as still photography. In his own right, he’s an artistic photographer.”

The exhibition begins the weekend of July 1.

Other good news at the center, since Pauline Santos has indicated that she has received two grants from the Mass Cultural Council to modernize the building. Santos said the building’s boiler needs to be replaced and the organization is currently raising matching funds to ensure the work is done.

Pauline Santos and Jill Law’s interview can be heard here:

town square sunday is a weekly public affairs program heard on Sunday mornings at 6am and 11am on 2:20pm and 99.5 FM.

The program spotlights individuals and organizations seeking to make the South Coast a better place to live and work.

if you would like your organization to be listed on town square sundayplease email the host at jim.phillips@townsquaremedia.com.

Meet the animals at Dartmouth’s Don’t Forget Us, Pet Us Sanctuary

Just off Faunce Corner Road in Dartmouth is a livestock animal sanctuary that is home to over 50 animals in just five short years. Whether they arrived because their owners could no longer care for them or they were removed from an abusive situation, Deborah Devlin and Jill Tagino, who run Don’t Forget Us, Pet Us sanctuary, welcome animals with nowhere to go. Obviously, the cattle they look after are very happy to have found a home for the rest of their natural life.

See the Dartmouth Mansion that is the definition of luxury

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How to Build a Filipino American Cultural Center Without a Roof https://shul21.org/how-to-build-a-filipino-american-cultural-center-without-a-roof/ Thu, 26 May 2022 16:00:20 +0000 https://shul21.org/how-to-build-a-filipino-american-cultural-center-without-a-roof/ What’s inside is every bit as eclectic and dynamic as the sidewalk view would imply. The 3,200 square foot studio, provided to Balay Kreative by SFMTA, was built to accommodate the needs of approximately half a dozen Filipino American artists, designers and small businesses as part of an experiment in course to create a cultural […]]]>

What’s inside is every bit as eclectic and dynamic as the sidewalk view would imply. The 3,200 square foot studio, provided to Balay Kreative by SFMTA, was built to accommodate the needs of approximately half a dozen Filipino American artists, designers and small businesses as part of an experiment in course to create a cultural center. During my visit, Balay Kreative Executive Director Desi Danganan gives me an energetic tour, highlighting artists who have met in the studio and collaborated, experiences in retail presentations and the table he passes most afternoons working.

This studio is just one side of Balay Kreative. The Philippine Arts Accelerator is currently accepting applications for its second round of grants after distributing funds to around 20 artists and projects in 2020. He helps program the parking lot that has become a lush event space Kapwa Gardensand he’s working at a future Filipino American brick-and-mortar cultural center in San Francisco.

Desi Danganan poses for a portrait at Balay Kreative in San Francisco, California, May 20, 2022. Danganan is the executive director of Balay Kreative. (Amaya Edwards)

All of this activity is in service of a very specific goal: to take the idea of ​​the SOMA Pilipinas Filipino Heritage District, established in 2016, and make it an economically sustainable reality through the power of arts and culture. San Francisco is home to nine cultural districts, the oldest (Japantown) was recognized in 2013, the newest (the Sunset Chinese Cultural District) was officially launched on May 22, 2022. Naming a cultural district is only the first step. SOMA Pilipinas, 1.5 square miles in the South of Market neighborhood, aims to celebrate the Filipino community, prevent displacement, and develop economic and racial justice initiatives.

Arts and culture is the key,” says Danganan. “That’s going to be the anchor for really accelerating that kind of community engagement of coming back to your community, giving back and rebuilding it.” His vision is for Mission Street to become a commercial corridor of Filipino American shops, restaurants and cultural spaces.

Balay Kreative is doing a lot with a very small team, and Danganan says the goal is not to grow the organization. “It’s about growing the arts and culture community,” he says. “That’s why we’re so determined to hand over the money. It shouldn’t be Balay Kreative coming up with all the ideas for our community. It’s about being that platform, that accelerator for the rest of our community members to realize their dreams and visions.

Gina Mariko Rosales poses for a portrait in her space at Balay Kreative on May 20, 2022 in San Francisco. (Amaya Edwards)

A House of Creatives

The Balay Kreative story begins with undiscovered SFa creative night market established in 2017 by Kultivate Labs, an arts and economic development nonprofit that Danganan also runs.

These rallies in and around the Old Mint were a huge success, drawing crowds and press attention and fostering a real sense of belonging within the local Filipino American community. Robin Aquilizan sold in many night markets with his family’s streetwear brand Art Bayani. “I’m telling you, this is one of the best events in the Bay Area,” she says. “It’s always a good time. The community is great, super supportive.

In 2019, the San Francisco Mayor’s Office of Housing and Community Development awarded Kultivate Labs a $275,000 grant to support the development of a new Filipino American cultural center in SoMa. Balay Kreative (“House of Creatives”) started with a core team consisting of Danganan, Kim Acebo Arteche (now co-director of the Berkeley Art Center) and Gina Mariko Rosales (founder of the event production company Do it Marikowhich co-organizes Undiscover SF).

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CreArte Latino Cultural Center Receives Community Foundation of Sarasota County Grant https://shul21.org/crearte-latino-cultural-center-receives-community-foundation-of-sarasota-county-grant/ Wed, 25 May 2022 04:10:57 +0000 https://shul21.org/crearte-latino-cultural-center-receives-community-foundation-of-sarasota-county-grant/ The coast of the gift DAILY SRQ WEDNESDAY PHILANTHROPY EDITION WEDNESDAY 25 MAY 2022 | Pictured: CreArte Latino Learning. Photo courtesy of the CreArte Latino Cultural Center. The CreArte Latino Cultural Center has been selected to receive a $6,900 Community Impact Grant from the Community Foundation of Sarasota County. The grant will support funding for […]]]>

The coast of the gift


Pictured: CreArte Latino Learning. Photo courtesy of the CreArte Latino Cultural Center.

The CreArte Latino Cultural Center has been selected to receive a $6,900 Community Impact Grant from the Community Foundation of Sarasota County. The grant will support funding for facilitators of CreArte Latino’s many classes and workshops for adults, children and families. The bilingual arts and education nonprofit serves as a creative hub for the burgeoning Hispanic/Latino communities in Sarasota and Manatee counties. CreArte Latino’s mission is to be a connection between Latinos/Hispanics and the community at large through artistic and educational opportunities and events. “This grant gives us the opportunity to expand our educational programming and reach over 200 students,” says Carolina Franco, Artistic Director and President of CreArte Latino. She explains that her organization seeks to solve a cultural problem that particularly affects young people in the surrounding Latino/Hispanic community. “There may be a lack of knowledge about their roots. Children may not speak Spanish and have no idea of ​​their culture. We want to strengthen their pride and give them direct experience of their rich heritage. We are deeply grateful to the Community Foundation of Sarasota County for supporting us in this important mission.

The CreArte Latino Cultural Center program for 2022-2023 includes the ongoing “Amigos Book Club” for adults and a new “Amigos Book Club” for children, both for Spanish speakers. Additionally, there is an adult course in Spanish for English speakers called “Conversemos” and an adult course in English for Spanish speakers called “Let’s Talk in English”. Book clubs and language courses are all done through the Zoom platform. For in-person learning, the Center provides two theater workshops for children and a music-making and dance workshop for young people. CreArte Latino encourages family participation in children’s classes.

Pictured: CreArte Latino Learning. Photo courtesy of the CreArte Latino Cultural Center.

To find out more click here

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Dagupan creates a new cultural center, a museum for the “return to sources” of national artists https://shul21.org/dagupan-creates-a-new-cultural-center-a-museum-for-the-return-to-sources-of-national-artists/ Mon, 23 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://shul21.org/dagupan-creates-a-new-cultural-center-a-museum-for-the-return-to-sources-of-national-artists/ Republic Act No. 11726 directs the establishment of the Edades and Bernal Cultural Center and Museum in the city of Dagupan DAGUPAN CITY, Pangasinan — National artists Victorio Edades and Salvador Bernal, both of Dagupan City, will soon have a permanent haven for their works, with President Rodrigo Duterte giving the go-ahead for the construction […]]]>

Republic Act No. 11726 directs the establishment of the Edades and Bernal Cultural Center and Museum in the city of Dagupan

DAGUPAN CITY, Pangasinan — National artists Victorio Edades and Salvador Bernal, both of Dagupan City, will soon have a permanent haven for their works, with President Rodrigo Duterte giving the go-ahead for the construction of the Edades and Bernal Cultural Center and Museum.

Duterte signed on April 29 Republic Act No. 11726based on House Bill B08133 written by Pangasinan 4e Representative of the Christopher de Venecia district. The law mandates the establishment of the Edades and Bernal Cultural Center and Museum in their birthplace, as well as the promotion of local culture and arts and other creative industries in the community.

Victorio Edades, born December 23, 1985 in Barangay Bolosan, was also known as the father of modern Filipino painting. He was proclaimed a national artist in 1976.

Salvador “Badong” Bernal, meanwhile, began his career in 1969. He was later hailed as the father of theater design and was proclaimed a National Artist of Theater and Design in 2003, eight years before his death.

PRIDE OF DAGUPAN. National artist Salvador Bernal’s design for the 1995 zarzuela “Sa Bunganga ng Pating” was executed using fish skeletons and bones. (Courtesy of “Badong: Salvador Bernal Designs the Stage” Exhibition)

The construction of the museum will be a joint collaboration between the Dagupan City Government and the National Commission for Culture and Arts. The local government will provide the land while the NCCA will provide the funds to begin construction.

“[The museum] shall be a collaboration between the Dagupan City Government and the National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCAA) with its relevant affiliated cultural agencies and relevant academic and private partners, and members of governance, organization , operations and development to be provided by mutual agreement between the parties, to be executed and published within one (1) year from the entry into force of this law”, specifies the law.

De Venecia was delighted with the news, saying it had been a long-time dream to give due recognition to the city’s pioneers in the arts.

“This galvanizes the state policy of preserving the works of our national artists and recognizes their importance in the nation’s cultural heritage,” De Venecia said in a statement.

De Venecia also leads the Select Committee on Creative Industry and the Performing Arts in the House of Representatives. Rappler.com

Ahikam Pasion is a Luzon-based journalist and winner of the Aries Rufo Journalism Fellowship.

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Reasons to love the Samuel E. Kelly Ethnic Cultural Center https://shul21.org/reasons-to-love-the-samuel-e-kelly-ethnic-cultural-center/ Tue, 17 May 2022 01:32:09 +0000 https://shul21.org/reasons-to-love-the-samuel-e-kelly-ethnic-cultural-center/ Frank Irigon ♥ | Because you can do great things there We took over a community newspaper and, from the ECC, we created the first pan-Asian publication in Seattle. It all started with Diane Wong, 1972, Norman Mar, 1972, Alan Sugiyama, 1984 and me. I remember a meeting at the ECC to name him. We […]]]>

Frank Irigon

♥ | Because you can do great things there

We took over a community newspaper and, from the ECC, we created the first pan-Asian publication in Seattle. It all started with Diane Wong, 1972, Norman Mar, 1972, Alan Sugiyama, 1984 and me. I remember a meeting at the ECC to name him. We had a number of ideas and someone brought up the Sly and the Family Stone song, “Family Affair”. We took that and created “Asian Family Affair”.*

We met at the center on Saturdays and Sundays and did everything by hand. Sometimes we had to ask the campus police to let us in on weekends. We had an IBM electric typewriter and we wrote and laid out the paper, collecting all the stories and pictures. The University gave us this space to publish a newspaper and tell stories that no other local media would produce. We wrote about Alaska Cannery workers and Executive Order 9066, the 1942 executive order that led to the incarceration of 120,000 Japanese Americans. We interviewed Patsy Takemoto Mink, the first woman of color elected to Congress, and George Takei, actor and activist. We were pushing to showcase Asians in public roles.

None of us got paid. The newspaper was a labor of love for our community and a need to spread the news. Many of us were going to school and the ECC was close. Without being able to start there on campus, I don’t know how long we could have stayed focused. At ECC, we had a stimulating environment. It was a place where people could have different points of view and still get along.

Frank Irigon’76, ’79, longtime activist and co-founder and alumnus Executive Director of the International District Community Health Center. Recipient of the 2022 Charles E. Odegaard Prize.

*In 1972, Asian American and Pacific Islander students established Asian Family Affair, the first pan-Asian newspaper in the Northwest. The hardworking team of reporters covered topics such as labor disputes, neighborhood preservation and women’s rights. They did this work from the Ethnic Cultural Center.

In 1975, the Asian Family Affair, a newspaper produced by UW students for readers of Seattle’s Asian American community, focused on the rights, activism, and community experience of Asian Americans. Asian origin.


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