Cultural arts – Shul 21 http://shul21.org/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 20:05:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://shul21.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-17-120x120.png Cultural arts – Shul 21 http://shul21.org/ 32 32 Kent’s Standing Rock Cultural Arts will host a drumming workshop and performances featuring Kenyan band Kenge Kenge Orutu System on June 25-26 https://shul21.org/kents-standing-rock-cultural-arts-will-host-a-drumming-workshop-and-performances-featuring-kenyan-band-kenge-kenge-orutu-system-on-june-25-26/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 20:05:00 +0000 https://shul21.org/kents-standing-rock-cultural-arts-will-host-a-drumming-workshop-and-performances-featuring-kenyan-band-kenge-kenge-orutu-system-on-june-25-26/ KENT, Ohio – Standing Rock Cultural Arts will host two community performances and an interactive workshop featuring the Kenge Kenge Orutu system based in Nairobi, Kenya on June 25-26. The music of Kenge Kenge Orutu System is inspired by the traditional roots of the Luo people of western Kenya. The group performs its own versions […]]]>

KENT, Ohio – Standing Rock Cultural Arts will host two community performances and an interactive workshop featuring the Kenge Kenge Orutu system based in Nairobi, Kenya on June 25-26.

The music of Kenge Kenge Orutu System is inspired by the traditional roots of the Luo people of western Kenya. The group performs its own versions of old songs by mixing them with benga, the indigenous popular music form of Kenya. The band members use instruments such as the orutu (one-stringed fiddle), nyatiti (eight-stringed lyre), oporo (cow’s horn) and asili (blown flute), traditional percussion instruments and traditional songs and dances.

Performances include:

  • Saturday, June 25, 7-9 p.m. at North Water Street Gallery, 300 N. Water St., Suite H., Kent. A donation of $5 is suggested. Buy tickets.
  • A free community concert on Sunday, June 26 from 3:30-5 p.m. at Hometown Bank Plaza at the corner of Water and Main streets in downtown Kent.

The group will be hosting an interactive workshop on Saturday June 25 from 2-4pm at the North Water Street Gallery. A $10 donation is suggested for the workshop. Register online.

Kenge Kenge Orutu System, which means an uplifting fusion of small instruments, has performed on five continents at venues and festivals such as Lincoln Center, Smithsonian Folklife Festival, American Folk Festival, Rainforest World Music Festival and NPR’s “All Things Considered.” .”

Performances are sponsored by the Ohio Arts Council and the City of Kent.

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Cultural Arts Commission 2022-2023 Work Plan Approved by City Council | Coronado City News https://shul21.org/cultural-arts-commission-2022-2023-work-plan-approved-by-city-council-coronado-city-news/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 00:27:00 +0000 https://shul21.org/cultural-arts-commission-2022-2023-work-plan-approved-by-city-council-coronado-city-news/ At City Council’s last meeting, Coronado’s Cultural Arts Commission (CAC), represented by Heidi Wilson and Kelly Purvis, presented its Fiscal Year 2021-2022 Annual Report and Work Plan for Fiscal Year 2022. -2023. The CAC is now in its eleventh year as a civic organization facilitating the arts in Coronado in a variety of ways. “It’s […]]]>

At City Council’s last meeting, Coronado’s Cultural Arts Commission (CAC), represented by Heidi Wilson and Kelly Purvis, presented its Fiscal Year 2021-2022 Annual Report and Work Plan for Fiscal Year 2022. -2023.

The CAC is now in its eleventh year as a civic organization facilitating the arts in Coronado in a variety of ways. “It’s been an incredible ten years,” said Wilson, mentioning their appreciation for the support CAC has received over the years from the community and city council. “Our goals then are what they are today,” she continued.

Purvis jumped into detail about CAC’s mission and goals, which include supporting and developing the arts and community enrichment. The CAC is also reintroducing the seven arts programs it started with when the organization began, each of which covers either a specific area of ​​the arts or a function critical to the CAC’s growth and success.

The CAC celebrated the retirement of five Commissioners and subsequently welcomed new Commissioners to help lead these seven program areas, which are: Arts + Prosperity led by Marcus Echols Booth, Arts Education led by Paul Schutz, Arts Partners led by Heidi Wilson, Communications: Public Relations and Media led by Jeanmarie Bond, Literary and Performing Arts led by Dawn Richards, Public Art led by Deb Kaller and Visual Arts led by Teresa Espaniola.

The new Arts + Prosperity program was created in the wake of the pandemic as CAC considered community needs. “Coming out of COVID, what felt important was being able to help our artistic partners recover, so we have a new program area called ‘Arts + Prosperity’, which is primarily focused on creating and identifying grant opportunities for our arts partners and working with each organization to be able to find the grants that are right for them,” Wilson explained.

The Arts + Prosperity program’s 2022-2023 work plan is to complete the Arts and Economic Prosperity Survey (AEP6) and 10 audience engagement surveys in 2022. In addition, the program will work with local nonprofit organizations, sharing the results of these surveys to learn and demonstrate the economic impact of arts and cultural activities in Coronado, and developing a database of grantmaking opportunities for use by nonprofit partners.

Another program under the ACE umbrella is the Arts Education Program, dedicated to promoting education and performance and/or exhibition opportunities for all ages in the community. This team recently released the program’s Summer 2022 Arts Education Directory, which features 29 local arts educators the Commission has recognized and partnered with who dabble in a variety of art forms.

In addition to the Arts Education Summer Directory, the Arts Education Program will also strive to create an event that recognizes the contributions of these arts educators to the community and promotes new opportunities for engagement with and among them.

The Arts Partners program aims to identify opportunities for partnerships with local, regional and national arts service organizations with the goal of encouraging local arts programs and collaborations within Coronado as a way to improve the quality of life. CAC recently celebrated its 10th anniversary with an article in Coronado magazine, and its work plan for the current fiscal year includes working with the Coronado Public Library to launch a monthly show on the city’s local channel.

“Each episode will highlight activities happening at the library as well as upcoming events in the community. It will focus on an individual artist and maybe a performer and visual artist will have a segment that will be on one of our artistic partners,” Wilson described. “We call it ‘A peak behind the curtains’. … It’s really going to feed into the work that our artistic partners are doing with the artistic community and we’re looking forward to having that. These segments will also be uploaded to one or more of CAC’s social media platforms for viewing as well.

Additionally, the Arts Partners program will focus on a singular theme over the next fiscal year around Sybil Stockdale and the League of Wives, and the 50th anniversary of the return of Vietnamese prisoners of war to the United States. In addition to highlighting these topics, they would like to create an event to recognize the contributions of Coronado’s nonprofit volunteers.

The communications program, which encompasses public relations and media for the CAC, was able to resume publishing the CAC “Four on Friday” events, and to an increased number of subscribers. They are also preparing to launch a new website with a new logo and branding for “Coronado Cultural Arts” in July. Over the course of the year, this program will also focus on developing a CCA social media team and pursuing its goal of promoting Coronado arts, artists, and organizations through the new website. , event calendars, etc.

One of ACE’s new umbrella programs this year is the Literature and Performing Arts program. On the literary side, this program will seek to identify and promote opportunities and introduce local authors, playwrights, screenwriters and other artists in the literary arts, working with and supporting the Coronado Public Library to encourage groups literature and events for the community. as well as the Community READ event.

On the performing arts side, this program will provide similar encouragement and promotion of performing arts disciplines and opportunities for the community and visitors to participate in and enjoy enriching live performances.

The Public Art Program focuses on curating public art in Coronado that celebrates the city’s current and evolving history, heritage, times, and ways of life, and embraces social diversity. “We have the Public Art app that launched last year,” Purvis mentioned of one of the program’s recent accomplishments. The Public Art Program will work this year on creating a way to integrate each public piece into the Public Art Walking Tour app for the community and visitors to enjoy and easily access more information about each piece. .

The newest piece of public art to be installed in Coronado, “Crossing Paths” by artist Amos Robinson, was also celebrated with a dedication ceremony June 8 at the Avenida del Sol cul-de-sac where now find the room. Another piece of public art is due to be installed in July (a piece called ‘The Knot’) and a proposal for a League of Wives memorial project is also in the works and will be brought to Council for consideration in the weeks to come. come.

Finally, the Visual Arts program, which aims to raise awareness and promote opportunities for Coronado’s visual arts community, collaborated with the Coronado Public Library to open a new art gallery in the Spreckels Reading Room during the last year. CAOT also sponsored the “Magnetic” exhibit in the Community Center‘s C3 gallery, which features work by students from the Coronado School of the Arts (CoSA).

The program also contributed to the Honor Project celebrating Tom Rice and provided the impetus for Orange Avenue banners recognizing local artists and non-profit organizations. Their work plan includes an upcoming event on June 16 with the opening of a new exhibition Summer Sizzle at C3 Gallery which will run until September 15, and a new artist event “Oh My Gauche” on September 23. July.

The previously separate facilities program is now part of the Arts + Prosperity program, but last year it helped facilitate the CUSD Performing Arts Center Theater upgrade project and helped secure an additional $100,000 from the neighborhood reinvestment grant program.

“We want to thank you for your support and unwavering dedication to ensuring Coronado’s creative community is supported,” Wilson concluded, “it really made a difference.” Council unanimously approved the report and work plan of the Cultural Arts Commission.

More information about the Cultural Arts Commission and upcoming events can be found on their website at https://coronadoarts.com/.

FLIGHT. 112, NO. June 24 – 15, 2022

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Larry Lundy presents Wave After Wave at the Noyes Cultural Arts Center https://shul21.org/larry-lundy-presents-wave-after-wave-at-the-noyes-cultural-arts-center/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 04:31:08 +0000 https://shul21.org/larry-lundy-presents-wave-after-wave-at-the-noyes-cultural-arts-center/ Local artist Larry Lundy, known professionally as LP Lundy, opened its “Wave After Wave” exhibit in the Noyes Cultural Arts Center’s second-floor gallery on May 20. Through July 17, the exhibition features some of his earlier works alongside lake photographs from his “Looking East of Etown” series. which he has been working on since 2012. […]]]>

Local artist Larry Lundy, known professionally as LP Lundy, opened its “Wave After Wave” exhibit in the Noyes Cultural Arts Center’s second-floor gallery on May 20. Through July 17, the exhibition features some of his earlier works alongside lake photographs from his “Looking East of Etown” series. which he has been working on since 2012.

Lundy began art direction in high school, when he redesigned the format of his school’s literary magazine. He then edited for SUNY Buffalo State College Literary Magazine, where he changed the name from “Elm Leaves” to “LEEVZ”, pushing conventional boundaries.

After moving to Chicago in 1979, Lundy developed projects like the LOOP Show, which he said aimed to put Chicago-centric art on the map. In addition to a traditional artistic career, Lundy began working in art direction and set design for film and television in the 1980s.

Lundy will teach RTVF 379, a production design course at Northwestern, this fall. The Daily spoke to Lundy about his current exposure and his rich history as a creator.

This interview has been edited for brevity and clarity.

Le Quotidien: When and where did you start your artistic career?

Monday : When I was a kid I knew I could draw and I thought everyone could, so I was surprised I couldn’t. My brain has been on fire ever since.

The Daily: It seems you’ve drawn much of your inspiration from dismantling conventional rules, grammar, what constitutes “real” art and the like. How has this principle guided your career?

Monday : I’m the kind of person who says, “If I’m on my bike and there’s no one coming anyway, I’ll go.” I won’t wait for the light to change. I really feel like some people would say I’m pushy, but for me, I’m an advocate for myself. And I feel like that’s something I’d like to pass on to young people in particular.

Le Quotidien: You have worked as a decorator and art director for many popular media, including “Shameless”, “Batwoman” and “High Fidelity”. How did you get into this job?

Monday : I ended up getting a job at a company that painted sets for themed parties. (When I quit this job after being denied a raise) I had no idea my friend Julia would be calling me from the Encyclopedia Britannica production office saying, “We need a painted backdrop for our decor.” I ended up staying there for two weeks – and made a lot of money because they were paying $5 an hour on the books – but that was my foot in the door.

Later (in my career), I developed a philosophical modality. I imagined the work being done, whatever it was, someone patting me on the back, shaking my hand and saying, “That was awesome.” And then I come back (to) where I start, then I’m like, “How do I get this?” A lot of times we fight and say, “Oh my god, what am I going to do?” I have the impression that it is something that needs to be deprogrammed because we are too angry with ourselves.

The Daily: Tell me about your most recent exhibition. Where does the inspiration for “Wave after Wave” come from?

Monday : It’s a combined exhibition, because I’ve had a lot of work that no one has ever seen — or very few people. And people didn’t know I was doing anything other than taking pictures of the lake. I have a painting I did when I was 13 from 1967 that I painted from a postcard from Oslo, Norway. I have a drawing of my high school girlfriend from 1970. (There are) pieces in there that I realized were emotionally connected to me, and I didn’t realize it at the time. ‘era. There are drawings of my sons.

Le Quotidien: Which piece of the exhibition stands out?

Monday : The largest room in the show is 11 feet wide, called “Rough Crossings,” three panels. And basically it’s a combination of a drawing and a painting. Panels are muslin treated with acrylic medium yellow dye and marble dust. And then on top of that, I add a porcelain marker, a black grease pencil, then I break it down with a solvent and it becomes a paint. So it’s very, very moody, not ominous, but gloomy, and it’s about going through a difficult time in your life.

Le Quotidien: Are there any messages you would like to leave with viewers?

Monday : I have three rules that I used when I was teaching, and also when I was working: work smart, have fun, be crazy. And then the last one is now new, called “be a sponge”, because I want people to absorb stuff. And don’t accept everything, but absorb it and then evaluate.

E-mail: [email protected]

Twitter: @AudreyHettleman

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Simi Valley Cultural Arts Center Presents June 19th Celebration https://shul21.org/simi-valley-cultural-arts-center-presents-june-19th-celebration/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 11:12:57 +0000 https://shul21.org/simi-valley-cultural-arts-center-presents-june-19th-celebration/ To celebrate Juneteenth, the Simi Valley Cultural Arts Center is partnering with the Actors’ Repertory Theater of Simi’s Untold Stories Living History Project and artist Jan Glasband to host a very special event on our main stage and gallery on Sunday, June 19 at from 3 p.m. This free event open to the public was […]]]>

To celebrate Juneteenth, the Simi Valley Cultural Arts Center is partnering with the Actors’ Repertory Theater of Simi’s Untold Stories Living History Project and artist Jan Glasband to host a very special event on our main stage and gallery on Sunday, June 19 at from 3 p.m. This free event open to the public was made possible by a grant from the California Arts Council.

Juneteenth is a federal holiday in the United States commemorating the emancipation of enslaved African Americans. It is also often observed to celebrate African American culture. Originating in Galveston, Texas, it has been celebrated annually on June 19 in various parts of the United States since 1865.

“We are thrilled to present Simi’s Untold Stories of Repertory Theater living history project and Jan Glasband’s incredible series of social justice graphite drawings in recognition of our June 19th celebration,” said said Fred Helsel, Executive Director of the Cultural Arts Center. “And thanks to the generosity of the California Arts Council, we are able to offer this program free to the public.”

Actors playing social justice leaders Rosa Parks, Malcom X and Maya Angelou will take the stage to share their incredible stories. Afterwards, light refreshments will be served in the Upper Gallery which features artist Jan Glasband’s series of graphite drawings on social justice. The actors and the artist will be present at the gallery exhibition to meet the people present at the event.

Los Angeles actress Tara Cox will portray Rosa Parks. Ms Parks was a civil rights leader whose refusal to give way to a white passenger on a separate bus led to the Montgomery bus boycott. His bravery led to national efforts to end racial segregation. Parks received the Martin Luther King Jr. Award from the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

On September 15, 1996, President Bill Clinton awarded Parks the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest honor bestowed by the executive branch of the United States. The following year, she received the Congressional Gold Medal, the highest honor bestowed by the US legislature.

Cox will be joined by Ventura County actor Stan McConnell as Malcolm X. Malcolm X was a cabinet minister, human rights activist and prominent black nationalist leader who served as a spokesman for the Nation of Islam in the 1950s and 1960s. Thanks in large part to his efforts, the Nation of Islam grew from just 400 members when he was released from prison in 1952 to 40,000 members by 1960. Articulate, passionate and a natural speaker gifted and inspiring, Malcolm X urged black people to throw off the shackles of racism “by any means necessary”, including violence. The fiery civil rights leader broke with the group shortly before his assassination on Feb. 21, 1965, at the Audubon Ballroom in Manhattan, where he was about to deliver a speech.

Rounding out the evening, Los Angeles-based actress Regan Carrington will play poet Maya Angelou. Ms. Angelou was born as Marguerite Johnson on April 4, 1928 in St. Louis, Missouri and grew up in St. Louis and Stamps, Arkansas. Maya Angelou has become one of the most renowned and influential voices of our time. With more than 50 honorary doctorates, Dr. Maya Angelou has become a celebrated poet, memoirist, educator, playwright, producer, actress, historian, filmmaker, and civil rights activist.

Admission to this special celebration is free and open to all Public. For more information, visit www.simi-arts.org or call the Cultural Arts Center at 805-583-7900.

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Juneteenth Celebration returns live and in person on June 16 | Arts & Theater https://shul21.org/juneteenth-celebration-returns-live-and-in-person-on-june-16-arts-theater/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 17:00:00 +0000 https://shul21.org/juneteenth-celebration-returns-live-and-in-person-on-june-16-arts-theater/ Juneteenth Celebration will return this year with all live, in-person events June 16-18 in Winston-Salem. The celebration, presented by Triad Cultural Arts, will culminate with a day-long festival at Biotech Place and Bailey Park on June 18. Activities will include performances, children’s events, food and panel discussions. This year’s theme for Juneteenth Celebration is “Black […]]]>

Juneteenth Celebration will return this year with all live, in-person events June 16-18 in Winston-Salem.

The celebration, presented by Triad Cultural Arts, will culminate with a day-long festival at Biotech Place and Bailey Park on June 18. Activities will include performances, children’s events, food and panel discussions.

This year’s theme for Juneteenth Celebration is “Black Health and Wellness: Healing Rituals & Traditions”.

In keeping with this theme, The Breathing Room will host mini yoga sessions between performances on the main stage from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. of the festival.

“We have incorporated our June 19 activities into the 2022 ASALH (Association for the Study of African American Life and History) Black History Month theme – “Health and Well- being black” – so that we can be part of a national voice on important concerns that deserve public attention,” said Cheryl Harry, Director of Triad Cultural Arts. “As a result, our art exhibit will feature healthcare professionals from the Twin City Medical Society who offer diversity in healthcare as an intentional way to address health disparities.

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“The health panel will address the intention to diversify the medical workforce. We will have several health and wellness exhibitors, ranging from a holistic birth doula to herbal beauty and wellness products.

Presenting partners for the celebration are Food Lion and the City of Winston-Salem.

Events

Activities will begin with an art exhibition opening reception from 6 to 8 p.m. on June 16 in the main gallery of the Milton Rhodes Center for the Arts at 251 N. Spruce St. The exhibition, a partnership between Triad Cultural Arts and Arts Council of Winston – Salem/Forsyth County, call themselves “Guardians of Wellbeing”. It celebrates black healthcare professionals past and present through art, photography and their stories. Other exhibition viewing dates are July 16-23.

New to the celebration this year is the Queen Juneteenth Scholarship Competition at 7 p.m. on June 17 at the Paisley IB Magnet School. Thirteen high school girls will compete for a renewable four-year scholarship to a historically black college or university (HBCU). Talitha Vickers, former WXII news anchor, will host the culture-based theatrical production.

On June 18, the Juneteenth Festival will feature a variety of events indoors at Biotech Place, 575 Patterson Ave., and outdoors at Bailey Park, 445 Patterson Ave., in the Innovation District.

Biotech Place will host events from 1 to 5 p.m., including performances, panel discussions and heritage demonstrations. Bailey Park events will run from 1 p.m. to 8 p.m. and will include vendors, exhibits, music and food.

P-Funk Connection described by Harry as “an old-school Atlanta-based band that has the DNA of Mr. George Clinton, Parliament Funkadelic” will headline the entertainment. The band will take the stage at 6 p.m.

More than 80 wellness, merchandise and nonprofit exhibitors and vendors will participate, including food trucks with soul food dishes.

Festival-goers are encouraged to bring lawn chairs, blankets and umbrellas.

Round tables

The Black Health Roundtable, sponsored by Atrium Health, will begin at 2 p.m. at the festival’s Biotech Place on June 18. The topic is “Workforce Diversity: Reducing Disparities Through Intentional Focus”.

Panelists are Fernando G. Little, director of corporate diversity for Atrium Health and Kayla Mays, MD candidate. Dr. Brenda Latham-Sadler, Senior Associate Dean for Justice, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion and Associate Professor of Family and Community Medicine at Wake Forest University School of Medicine, is the moderator.

The objectives of the roundtable are the reduction of financial barriers to education and training, the intentional development of pathways for minority students and methods of academic support and professional development of students in health careers. .

“Atrium Health’s bold diversity equity and inclusion goal aims to achieve transformative equity in healthcare, leadership, workforce, learners and community” , said Jakki Opollo, vice president of talent initiatives and regional director of diversity at Wake Forest Baptist. “We want our workforce, leadership and learner population to reflect the patient population we serve. To that end, we have specific strategies and tactics aimed at ensuring equitable opportunities for representation in leadership, workforce, learning, recruiting, retention, and pipelines for all.

Especially for children

In the youth zone inside Biotech Place, Delta Arts Center will offer craft activities, and Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority will offer children’s songs, a Juneteenth Tea Party and a special project to paint T-shirts that will be shipped in different countries by the soles Organization of the 4 souls.

Additionally, Amir Alexander, healthcare professional and author, will read excerpts from his book, “Gio’s Heart,” which shares real lessons learned through a difficult experience in intensive care and a journey with hypoplastic left heart syndrome ( HLHS).

Other activities for children will include face painting, bingo, crowd participation in the African movement and crowd participation in the progress demonstration.

More entertainment

Many activities will be offered on three stages of the festival. They include Piney Grove Baptist Church Choir, Deborah Patterson, Renaissance Choir, Greater Vision Company, Quick Image Band, Otesha Creative Arts Ensemble, Band Clazz and Big Ron Hunter.

Hunter, often called “the happiest blues man alive”, has hosted the festival for years. He’ll perform old-school blues and gospel songs at 2 p.m. on the Bailey Park Outdoor Stage.

He said he would definitely play two of his favorite gospel songs – “I’m Gonna Live So God Can Use Me” and “You’ve Got to Move”.

He likes to play happy blues songs.

“A blues song I’m going to play is called ‘The Things I Used to Do’,” Hunter said with a laugh. “It’s a crazy blues song… It’s crazy, but it’s a happy blues song.”

Annual celebration

Juneteenth commemorates the emancipation of enslaved African Americans and became a federal holiday in 2021.

“Juneteenth, the longest-running celebration of the abolition of slavery in the nation, is a testament to our nation’s core values ​​- freedom and justice for all,” Harry said.

“I agree with journalist Candice Harrison who said the holidays ‘do not simply reflect the values ​​of the nation. They anchor these values ​​in us. They teach us who and what matters, what to remember and what to forget.

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ALL OVER THE MAP is now playing at the Fellowship Cultural Arts Center in Basking Ridge https://shul21.org/all-over-the-map-is-now-playing-at-the-fellowship-cultural-arts-center-in-basking-ridge/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://shul21.org/all-over-the-map-is-now-playing-at-the-fellowship-cultural-arts-center-in-basking-ridge/ Acclaimed storyteller Bill Bowers recently sat down to discuss his new show, All Over the Map, which is currently running through June 18 at the Fellowship Cultural Arts Center in Basking Ridge. The show is presented by the American Theater Group (ATG), a professional regional theater company currently celebrating its tenth season. Hailed by critics […]]]>

Acclaimed storyteller Bill Bowers recently sat down to discuss his new show, All Over the Map, which is currently running through June 18 at the Fellowship Cultural Arts Center in Basking Ridge. The show is presented by the American Theater Group (ATG), a professional regional theater company currently celebrating its tenth season.

Hailed by critics as the most accomplished and renowned physical storyteller of his generation, Bowers has performed in all 50 states and 26 countries, appearing at the Kennedy Center and Radio City Music Hall in addition to the White House. His Broadway credits include The Lion King and The Scarlet Pimpernel.

It received universal critical acclaim, as best summed up by The Nashville Scene who noted that “Bowers’ comedic style could be defined as Robin Williams crossed with Martin Short…?

“We are thrilled to present Bill’s new show,” said Jim Vagias, ATG’s Production Artistic Director. “He is a true theatrical artist and an unparalleled storyteller. His performance will take the audience on a journey not just across the world, but through the human experience we all share. We were fortunate to have Bill present other shows for us over the years and they have always been enthusiastically received by sold-out crowds.”

Bowers receives accolades wherever he performs. As The Missoulian noted in a review, “Bowers is quite simply a sensation, a professional of bubbly energy, high presence, and liquid body…he is irresistible.”

Tickets for performances through June 18 are available by calling the box office at 866-307-8532 or online here: https://fellowshipculturalartscenter.org/event/american-theater-group-presents-all-over-the -map/ code: MAP10 for a special discount.

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The Arts Cultural Center will host the Maker’s Garage Sale on July 16 https://shul21.org/the-arts-cultural-center-will-host-the-makers-garage-sale-on-july-16/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 21:06:52 +0000 https://shul21.org/the-arts-cultural-center-will-host-the-makers-garage-sale-on-july-16/ Open the audio article player By Citizen staff | on June 07, 2022 The Cultural Arts Center at Glen Allen will host its second annual Manufacturer’s Garage Sale on Saturday, July 16 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Local artists and craftspeople of all skill levels are invited to shop for new materials or get […]]]>
Open the audio article player

Citizen staff

The Cultural Arts Center at Glen Allen will host its second annual Manufacturer’s Garage Sale on Saturday, July 16 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Local artists and craftspeople of all skill levels are invited to shop for new materials or get inspiration for their next project. This year’s garage sale will include jewelry making supplies, yarn and knitting supplies as well as fabrics and trims.

The “garage sale” will take place indoors and admission is free and open to the public. Admission to the Centre’s four art galleries will also be free, and visitors will be able to purchase items created by local makers in the Centre’s Atack Family gift shop.

Anyone interested in selling unused creative materials can apply here before July 1 to become a seller. The vendor fee is $5 per 6-foot table and applications can be emailed to programs@artsglenallen.com, dropped off at the center reception, or mailed to: CACGA, Attn: Maker’s Yard Sale, PO Box 1249, Glen Allen, VA 23060 Vendor Fees may be paid by check payable to ‘CACGA’, by credit card by calling 804-261-2787 or in person at the Center’s front desk.

For more details on the garage sale and the Glen Allen Cultural Arts Center, visit www.artsglenallen.com/ or call (804) 261-ARTS.


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Be Inspired: Join Them on Their Next Conversation – Lancaster Cultural Arts Center Series https://shul21.org/be-inspired-join-them-on-their-next-conversation-lancaster-cultural-arts-center-series/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 19:22:26 +0000 https://shul21.org/be-inspired-join-them-on-their-next-conversation-lancaster-cultural-arts-center-series/ LANCASTER, SC (CN2 NEWS) – As we watch the war unfold between Russia and Ukraine – Ukraine’s president has said 20% of his country is now under Russian control – many of us might have questions lingering on what is happening thousands of miles away. . The Lancaster Cultural Arts Center launches a year-round lecture […]]]>

LANCASTER, SC (CN2 NEWS) – As we watch the war unfold between Russia and Ukraine – Ukraine’s president has said 20% of his country is now under Russian control – many of us might have questions lingering on what is happening thousands of miles away. .

The Lancaster Cultural Arts Center launches a year-round lecture series featuring university professors, business leaders and civic leaders who address a variety of topics.
The first conference was from Davidson College in North Carolina to share some ideas.

Dr. Amanda Ewington, professor of Russian studies at Davidson College, went to Russia in high school and became fascinated with the country. She explains the importance of following what is happening in Ukraine and what the future holds for all of us saying:
“To also think about what it means to love your country, instead of only loving your country if you don’t recognize the dark sides of your country. That’s what Putin wants to happen, okay, we’re not talking about all the things Russia did wrong. We’re going to have this glorious, beautiful story of affirmation. So I think for people closer to home, that might be a message to think about, right. We can see when we look at Russia that this is not a good way to approach understanding your own country. So maybe we can bring that a bit home.

The next Lancaster Cultural Arts Center Conversation will take place on July 6 – it’s always the first Wednesday of every month.

July’s topic will be Leroy Springs and the development of Lancaster.

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IPCC to Launch First Indigenous Cultural Arts Festival with Film and Dance https://shul21.org/ipcc-to-launch-first-indigenous-cultural-arts-festival-with-film-and-dance/ Wed, 01 Jun 2022 23:02:11 +0000 https://shul21.org/ipcc-to-launch-first-indigenous-cultural-arts-festival-with-film-and-dance/ Ria Thundercloud (Sandia/Ho-Chunk) will perform at noon on Saturday, June 4 and Sunday, June 5. (Courtesy of Indian Pueblo Cultural Center) A silver lining from the pandemic has allowed the Pueblo Indian Cultural Center to reinvent its annual Pueblo Film Festival. After two years of work, IPCC staff will unveil the first Indigenous Cultural Arts […]]]>
Ria Thundercloud (Sandia/Ho-Chunk) will perform at noon on Saturday, June 4 and Sunday, June 5. (Courtesy of Indian Pueblo Cultural Center)

A silver lining from the pandemic has allowed the Pueblo Indian Cultural Center to reinvent its annual Pueblo Film Festival.

After two years of work, IPCC staff will unveil the first Indigenous Cultural Arts Festival on Saturday June 4 and Sunday June 5.

“We wanted to offer audiences more culture in a single festival,” says Alicia Ortiz, director of arts and cultural programs at the IPCC. “It’s also a chance for people to see Native American dances. We still don’t have that in our pueblos. It’s a project like this that benefits everyone.

Ortiz says the event will celebrate culture, community and heritage, as the terms and concepts have been used to differentiate the many different civilizations in the Western Hemisphere in order to recognize and distinguish themselves from one another.

She says that indigenous civilizations, from generation to generation, have developed and perpetuated their distinctive designs and patterns which they can rightfully claim as their heritage.

“Our Indigenous Cultural Arts Festival incorporates the premise of storytelling through digital, film, dance and music for artists and producers to be stewards of the Indigenous narrative, to celebrate and proclaim their unique interpretation of culture, community and heritage,” says Ortiz. “The two-day event will feature panel discussions on film.”

There will also be music in the courtyard of the IPCC.

Ortiz says the film festival will launch its first block of films with documentary narration.

The next block of films is under the back-to-basics umbrella and deals with the art behind the camera.

The Yellow Bird (Apache) Indian dancers will close the Indigenous Cultural Arts Festival each day.

The last block of films will focus on the sustainability of culture, the preservation of the past in the future.

“Our theme was to address topics like perseverance and stewardship,” says Ortiz. “Films relate to topics and there will be panel discussions after each block of films.”

On Sunday, both blocks of films will focus on the next generation of storytellers and the power of perseverance.

“Students from the IAIA (Institute of American Indian Arts) will present films, including short films,” she says.

During both days, there will be music and dance performances by artists from the Navajo, Zuni, Sandia/Ho-Chunk, Northern Cheyenne and Apache tribes and pueblos.

“We have Apache’s Yellow Bird Indian Dancers,” says Ortiz. “They close the two days in show. They are hoop dancers and bring a different type of dance to the program.

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City of Leland to host hurricane exhibit at Cultural Arts Center https://shul21.org/city-of-leland-to-host-hurricane-exhibit-at-cultural-arts-center/ Wed, 01 Jun 2022 19:02:44 +0000 https://shul21.org/city-of-leland-to-host-hurricane-exhibit-at-cultural-arts-center/ The City of Leland will host its second annual Hurricane Expo on Saturday, June 11 (Photo: City of Leland) LELAND, NC (WWAY) – The City of Leland will host its second annual Hurricane Expo on Saturday, June 11 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Leland Cultural Arts Center, located at 1212 Magnolia Village […]]]>
The City of Leland will host its second annual Hurricane Expo on Saturday, June 11 (Photo: City of Leland)

LELAND, NC (WWAY) – The City of Leland will host its second annual Hurricane Expo on Saturday, June 11 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Leland Cultural Arts Center, located at 1212 Magnolia Village Way.

This year’s expo will include workshops on the outlook for hurricane season, a Q&A panel with city staff and public safety officials, and presentations on flooding and insurance.

The goal is to ensure residents are prepared if a hurricane impacts our area this season by providing a one-stop-shop for resources and to answer all of their hurricane and storm-related questions.

Questions for the panel comprised of City employees and public safety officers must be submitted using this form by June 5..

Emergency management partners from across the region will be there to help your family prepare.

City of Leland personnel from Fire and Rescue, Police, Utilities, and Planning and Inspections will participate in Expo Hurricane.

Other participating agencies include Brunswick County Emergency Services, Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office, American Red Cross, North Carolina Cooperative Extension Agency, Carolina Department of Insurance North, Wilmington Area Department of Reconstruction, WWAY TV3 and H2GO.

Learn more about Expo Hurricane 2022 on the City’s website.

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