Cultural arts – Shul 21 http://shul21.org/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 01:40:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://shul21.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-17-120x120.png Cultural arts – Shul 21 http://shul21.org/ 32 32 Fujian Megachurch establishes cultural arts center https://shul21.org/fujian-megachurch-establishes-cultural-arts-center/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 01:40:12 +0000 https://shul21.org/fujian-megachurch-establishes-cultural-arts-center/ A century-old mega-church in China’s southeastern coastal province of Fujian has founded a cultural and artistic center for calligraphy enthusiasts, inviting calligraphers to train them. As many believers who enjoy calligraphy and painting at Fuzhou Flower Lane Church need a place for their activities, the church set up a service center in June, providing them […]]]>

A century-old mega-church in China’s southeastern coastal province of Fujian has founded a cultural and artistic center for calligraphy enthusiasts, inviting calligraphers to train them.

As many believers who enjoy calligraphy and painting at Fuzhou Flower Lane Church need a place for their activities, the church set up a service center in June, providing them with free learning materials. Monday to Friday.

It is said that more than a dozen church members come to the center every day, practicing calligraphy and painting as well as communication.

Besides opening a calligraphy and painting exhibition hall to display the works of believers, the center also plans to hold joint exhibitions with churches in Guangdong or other places.

– Translated by Abigail Wu

福州基督教花巷堂成立武夷文化艺术服事中心

Fujian Megachurch establishes cultural arts center

]]>
The Arts Cultural Center celebrates 4 new exhibitions https://shul21.org/the-arts-cultural-center-celebrates-4-new-exhibitions/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 18:08:37 +0000 https://shul21.org/the-arts-cultural-center-celebrates-4-new-exhibitions/ Open the audio article player By Citizen staff | on September 19, 2022 Photos by Dave Pearson for the Henrico Citizen One or more thumbnail images are missing. 63699 fake fake fake fake true fake fake fake fake fake fake The Cultural Arts Center at Glen Allen celebrated the opening of four new exhibits with […]]]>
Open the audio article player

Citizen staff

One or more thumbnail images are missing.

The Cultural Arts Center at Glen Allen celebrated the opening of four new exhibits with “Art Night” on September 15.

As well as highlighting the four exhibits – “Kaleidoscope – Rekindling a History”, “The Peaches Will Be Blue”, “Richmond: A Diary” and “Unusual Turnings” – the event also included live music and artifacts from local manufacturers. The artists behind the exhibitions were also present to discuss their works with the participants.

“Kaleidoscope” features a variety of artful and colorful quilts from Kuumba Afrikan American Quilting Guild – works ranging from reinvented traditional patterns to modern interpretations of fiber art. Kuumba has been around since 2012 and is made up of members who want to develop art that brings African American history and culture to life.

“The Peaches Will Be Blue” is an exhibition of collages and temporary acrylic paintings by Kay Vass Darling, who uses color and pattern to play with the subject of still life.

“Richmond: A Diary” is a series of paintings by John Price that capture a variety of moments in Richmond that the artist has shared with his girlfriend over the years. The diary records daily events and personal thoughts that shape their collective memory.

“Unusual Turnings” shows the wooden sculptures that can be made from local wood turned on a lathe. Barbara Dill is a local artist recognized internationally as an innovator in woodturning.

For more details, visit artsglenallen.com.

Our cover is free – but we need your help to provide it

You may notice that you did not have to pay to read this article. This is because we have never set up a paywall in our 21 years of existence. We believe that access to reliable and fair local media coverage is a basic human right, and we are committed to keeping all of our coverage free for everyone to consume.

This access is important because it helps readers connect with their community, helps them learn more about what’s going on around them (good and bad), fosters community conversations, and prompts meaningful action. Over 70,000 people read our coverage each month, and we believe our community is better off for it.

But as a small business, simply giving our “product” to everyone for free is not a sustainable business model. That’s why every voluntary contribution we receive, no matter how big or small, is critically important.

We know that not everyone can or wants to financially support our work. But if you can do it, we need you. Invest in our trusted local journalism today so thousands more in our community can benefit.

Click here to contribute!

]]>
The Calexico Cultural Center for the Arts rings in the spirit of Viva Mexico with an art exhibit | Entertainment https://shul21.org/the-calexico-cultural-center-for-the-arts-rings-in-the-spirit-of-viva-mexico-with-an-art-exhibit-entertainment/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 12:41:00 +0000 https://shul21.org/the-calexico-cultural-center-for-the-arts-rings-in-the-spirit-of-viva-mexico-with-an-art-exhibit-entertainment/ CALEXIC — The spirit of Mexican patriotism resonated here on September 13 with the long live mexico Art exhibition and event at the Carmen Durazo Cultural Art Center. The CDCAC site and the Calexico Recreation Department hosted the second annual event featuring a mix of paintings with traditional Mexican imagery and live performances by the […]]]>

CALEXIC — The spirit of Mexican patriotism resonated here on September 13 with the long live mexico Art exhibition and event at the Carmen Durazo Cultural Art Center.

The CDCAC site and the Calexico Recreation Department hosted the second annual event featuring a mix of paintings with traditional Mexican imagery and live performances by the Center’s folkloric ballet dancers, singer Patricia “Patty” Hurtado and Mariachi Aurora by Calexico. The artwork on display was the result of images created by CDCAC office assistant Eduardo Quintero, which were painted by local adults and teens in August for the event.

Although the city of Calexico is not holding a major public event in September 2022 as it has done in recent years outside of a proclamation ceremony held on September 14, the long live mexico the event served as a vehicle for an early celebration of Mexico’s September 16 Independence Day and the September 15 start of National Hispanic Heritage Month in the United States

“This is an attempt to be able to celebrate our heritage, our roots (and) our culture,” said Calexico recreation manager Norma Gerardo.

“We’re a sister city to Mexicali, and we want to make sure we remember where we come from and the mixed cultures we have here in Calexico,” she said.

Gerardo said around 90% of Calexico’s residents are of Mexican descent, so it’s important to “make sure even the younger generations know about the traditions and the culture.”

“It’s important for Mexican Americans to keep our roots in mind,” she said. “We not only celebrate July 4th but also September 16th.”

Quintero accepted.

“Mexican celebrations are always a party, always joyful, always with flowers and music, and on Mexico’s Independence Day, even more so,” he said. “We live here but we are still Mexicans.”

“It’s about maintaining interest and saving all (those aspects of culture) so they don’t disappear,” Quintero said. “This is Mexico.”

The event, open to everyone free of charge, began with the dance performance of the danza folklorico group. Although the group does not yet have an official name, Quintero said the folk dance group becomes the flagship group of the Carmen Durazo Cultural Arts Center and the Calexico Recreation Department.

Singer and staple of Calexico events, Patty Hurtado, sang a mix of traditional and popular songs from Mexico for those in attendance.

Mariachi Aurora from Calexico came in playing “El Son de La Negra”, playing about an hour of mostly traditional mariachi songs from Mexico. Calexico City Councilwoman Gloria Romo also participated in the performance singing the song “Puro Cachanilla”.

Mariachi Aurora’s signature Cumbia Medley made many spectators stand up and dance together in front of the stage at Gerardo’s invitation.

Hurtado closed the event with more songs as live entertainment.

Gerardo and the performers said they received positive feedback on the long live mexico an event.

Gerardo said that not so long ago, the Carmen Durazo Cultural Center for the Arts was only open for certain events or programs. Now, she and Quintero said the CDCAC has varied — some free and some paid — programs for the public to participate in and enjoy.

“I never tire of repeating it: the target of this arts cultural center is the community,” Quintero said, “that’s why we always organize events for them, so that the community grows, or else , at least the interests remain.

“We have a lot of work to do, and we have a desire to work even harder to reach more people in all walks of life,” Quintero said.

“These are opportunities to absorb our culture, our art, our traditions and the flavor of Mexican fiestas,” Gerardo said. “We are rooted together,” she said.

The art of long live mexico The exhibition will be on display at the Carmen Durazo Cultural Arts Center until September 22, according to the event flyer. The Carmen Durazo Cultural Center is located at 421 Heffernan Avenue in Calexico.

For more information about the CDCAC exhibit or classes, contact CDCAC staff by phone at 760-357-5575 or by email at culturalarts@calexico.gov.ca

]]>
Suffolk Cultural Arts Center hosts ‘world-class’ Kyiv City Ballet https://shul21.org/suffolk-cultural-arts-center-hosts-world-class-kyiv-city-ballet/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 11:12:09 +0000 https://shul21.org/suffolk-cultural-arts-center-hosts-world-class-kyiv-city-ballet/ SUFFOLK, Va. — The Suffolk Center for Cultural Arts is gearing up to host the biggest act ever on its historic stage. The Kyiv City Ballet is coming to town September 19-22 as part of the organization’s first ever US tour. “We are delighted to have these dancers here as they are a world-class group,” […]]]>

SUFFOLK, Va. — The Suffolk Center for Cultural Arts is gearing up to host the biggest act ever on its historic stage.

The Kyiv City Ballet is coming to town September 19-22 as part of the organization’s first ever US tour.

“We are delighted to have these dancers here as they are a world-class group,” said Lorelei Costa Morrow, director of the Suffolk Center.

Sabella, Antoine

The entrance to the Birdsong Theater at the Suffolk Center for Cultural Arts.

The ballet is to perform “Tribute to Peace: Ukrainian Repertoire” on Wednesday, September 21 at 7 p.m. “Swan Lake” will follow Thursday evening at 7 p.m.

But dancers will have the opportunity to get to know Suffolk from Monday, with a welcome reception closed to the public. It’s part of the city’s plan to try to make the band feel at home at a time when their home country of Ukraine is being turned upside down by the Russian invasion.

Costa Morrow tells News 3 that the ballet left Kyiv on one of the last flights in February…and hasn’t been able to return home since. The US tour was added to keep the dancers working and earning income.

When the opportunity arose to bring them to Suffolk, the Suffolk Center jumped at the chance.

“It pushes us to the limit in terms of dressing rooms, in terms of volunteers, but our community has been incredible in terms of the sponsorship of the performance, in terms of a lot of people in the community who have volunteered to help,” said Costa Morrow. .

With just over 500 seats, the Suffolk Center is a smaller venue than those that would normally host the Kyiv City Ballet. Costa Morrow tells News 3 it’s a unique opportunity for audiences to see world-class performers up close.

Prior to the performance, the Suffolk Center replaced hundreds of old seats with new, larger seats. The new seats also offer more legroom. The century-old venue – the former Suffolk High School – says it will also use the performance to launch a fundraising campaign to renovate the historic structure.

Ivan Kozlov and the artists of the Kyiv City Ballet

Kyiv City Ballet

Ivan Kozlov (executive) and the artists of the Kyiv City Ballet.

While in Suffolk, the Kyiv City Ballet is expected to offer educational programs and master classes at the Suffolk Center.

At four days, the ballet is staying in Suffolk longer than it would in most other towns.

“That’s why I got into the arts. For me, art is about sharing your experiences with your neighbours, in this case global neighbours. Learning from each other, developing empathy for each other, understanding the world better through someone else’s eyes, through art,” Costa Morrow said.

Click HERE for ticket information and more details on the Kyiv City Ballet tour.

]]>
Ships at the Savannah Arts Cultural Center https://shul21.org/ships-at-the-savannah-arts-cultural-center/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 13:03:09 +0000 https://shul21.org/ships-at-the-savannah-arts-cultural-center/ When a 2019 study found that African American artists made up just 1.2% of all works in the collections of America’s top museums, it clearly conveyed what many people of color already know, which is that the Racial inequality persists in institutions across the country. A further breakdown of that 1.2% showed that African American […]]]>
]]>
“Sara’s Sensorium” interactive and immersive art exhibition arrives at the Cultural Arts Center on September 14 https://shul21.org/saras-sensorium-interactive-and-immersive-art-exhibition-arrives-at-the-cultural-arts-center-on-september-14/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 17:32:11 +0000 https://shul21.org/saras-sensorium-interactive-and-immersive-art-exhibition-arrives-at-the-cultural-arts-center-on-september-14/ Sara O’Connor, a 3D sculpted painter, will present a one-day multi-sensory art exhibit titled “Sara’s Sensorium” at the Cultural Arts Center at Glen Allen on September 14, 6-9 p.m. “It’s like bringing a dream to life,” O’Connor said. “I want to evoke and compel people to do what was previously forbidden and to enjoy my […]]]>

Sara O’Connor, a 3D sculpted painter, will present a one-day multi-sensory art exhibit titled “Sara’s Sensorium” at the Cultural Arts Center at Glen Allen on September 14, 6-9 p.m.

“It’s like bringing a dream to life,” O’Connor said. “I want to evoke and compel people to do what was previously forbidden and to enjoy my art as I do. I want you to feel like a child again, full of curiosity and wonder and a desire to Engage your whole body and mind in the artistic experience. It’s time to play with art and try something new.

The free event is open to all ages and will provide an immersive experience that will allow guests to touch, taste, hear, smell and see paintings. The installation features a variety of his styles, including floralism, heavy-textured pointillism, small bites, and stripes. Each highlight shows O’Connor’s interest in exploring and expressing his love of color, texture, curiosity and growth.

“My mantra is the point, a single point of clarity, through which I channel my imagination,” she said. “I keep coming back to this point of focus until I have achieved calm, yet inviting mindfulness. My points almost represent a seed of possibility, from which my flowers bloom.

With this installation, O’Connor hopes to elevate texture, color and form by inviting guests to unleash their inner child and enjoy art by allowing participants to create artwork, listen to songs originally designed and to taste and smell the flavors it has associated. the exhibited work.

“I am deeply grateful that Lauren [Hall] and the Arts Cultural Center shared my vision for a new type of artistic experience and helped bring it to life,” she said. “I hope to present even more multi-sensory exhibits in the future. This experimental prototype is just the start of something new and flourishing.

Hall, ACCGA’s director of visual arts, is excited about the exhibit.

“This exhibition is an exciting way to immerse yourself in a work of art beyond just ‘sight’,” she said. “Experiencing each piece with all five senses makes you stop and react differently to the work. A traditional exhibition invites you to look. You then react to what you see emotionally. This time your vision is only part of the equation, so you get multiple perceptions, and possibly reactions, to the same coin based on each unique sense.

O’Connor is a traveling artist who has exhibited her work in Virginia, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Maryland, Georgia, Florida and Tennessee. Some of his collection is on permanent display and available for purchase at Pop of Confetti, a craft market in Carytown. Learn more about her at www.saraoconnorfineart.com.

The Arts Cultural Center is located at 2880 Mountain Road, Glen Allen. For more details, visit www.artsglenallen.com.

Our cover is free – but we need your help to provide it

You may notice that you did not have to pay to read this article. This is because we have never set up a paywall in our 21 years of existence. We believe that access to reliable and fair local media coverage is a basic human right, and we are committed to keeping all of our coverage free for everyone to consume.

This access is important because it helps readers connect with their community, helps them learn more about what’s going on around them (good and bad), fosters community conversations, and prompts meaningful action. Over 70,000 people read our coverage each month, and we believe our community is better off for it.

But as a small business, simply giving our “product” to everyone for free is not a sustainable business model. That’s why every voluntary contribution we receive, no matter how big or small, is critically important.

We know that not everyone can or wants to financially support our work. But if you can do it, we need you. Invest in our trusted local journalism today so thousands more in our community can benefit.

Click here to contribute!

]]>
MUSIC at the Simi Valley Cultural Arts Center https://shul21.org/music-at-the-simi-valley-cultural-arts-center/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 12:19:12 +0000 https://shul21.org/music-at-the-simi-valley-cultural-arts-center/ “I think it’s a show for 13-year-olds. That was the intention – to create a show that kids could call their own. I really struggled with any perception that it’s just a kids’ show, but at the same time, I wanted 13-year-olds to look up there and recognize themselves.” In 2007, composer Jason Robert Brown […]]]>

“I think it’s a show for 13-year-olds. That was the intention – to create a show that kids could call their own. I really struggled with any perception that it’s just a kids’ show, but at the same time, I wanted 13-year-olds to look up there and recognize themselves.”

In 2007, composer Jason Robert Brown addressed the words quoted above to a playwright from Los Angeles Daily News (OK, that was me) discussing his new musical, 13, which was about to have its world premiere at the Mark Taper Forum. At the time, one of the really interesting things about Brown’s creative spin on a spiny age (and an unlucky number) was that the musical would employ exactly 13 actors, and each of the cast and band members would belong to the adolescent population. Initially, I thought every company member and musician would actually be 13 years old. But no… I didn’t remember correctly. The players were all between 12 and 17 years old.

Now 17 is most certainly not 13, and while high school teenagers can certainly law like middle school kids (and if they’re playing a role, they’re supposed to), we need to be able to accept the “everyone is 13” without the visuals getting in the way. When a character talks about potentially offering “what comes after second base,” the message lands differently when she looks out of place at the prom.

These questions intervene to some extent in the staging of 13 by Panic Productions and Born to Perform Studio at Simi Valley Cultural Arts Center. On the whole, the children are doing more than well; sometimes a little rough around the edges, but again, this musical is too. In this third staging of the musical, Panic director Barry Pearl, musical director Lloyd Cooper and a cast of 19 give this heartfelt ode to self-discovery the sizzle and liveliness it deserves.

13 is a pleasant and quite tame musical, which does not change the situation. Brown with his book authors Dan Eilish and Robert Horn sand down the most jagged edges of early teens and wrap it up for easy handling. Yes, some children treat themselves terribly. Yes, everyone – popular or not – experiences the same hormonal angst. Yes, the cream will rise to the top and the good instincts will triumph over the bad and some of us will be able to kiss (or hug) and make up at the party.

No, not the ball…this time it’s a planned bar mitzvah where our future hero, Evan Goldman (played by Ethan Daugherty) joins his fellow thirteen-year-olds in a song called “Brand new You” and finally , also in the far more appropriate “A Little More Homework”. Note to Panic: It would be great to to listen these words clearly. Although the SVCCA was a comfortable venue, the body mics were spotty on opening night, making the acoustics problematic on opening night.

To the play… Evan’s journey took him from New York to the backcountry of Walkerton, Indiana following his parents’ divorce. As if being 13 isn’t enough, he’s uprooted from everything he knows in a town where there’s nothing to do and where he’ll eventually be the center of attention at his youngest’s biggest party ever. life. The bar mitzvah is, symbolically, when a Jewish boy becomes a man. But for Evan, if he doesn’t throw the party the right way, with the right crowd in attendance, he risks finding himself forever ostracized by the cool kids. Nicknamed “The Brain” because he comes up with some slightly devious good ideas, Evan plots and plans his way to creating the Jack Brett (Lucas Panczel) school, along with Kendra (Olivia Zenetzis), a cheerleader who loves Brett as much as he loves her. Trouble is, Kendra’s conniving best friend, Lucy (Calista Loter), wants Brett for herself and will plot as only a 13-year-old can plot to get him.

And these are the popular children. Evan’s new best friend – until he does a few dirty tricks to him – is his neighbor, Patrice (Mia Akemi Brown), a misfit regularly tortured by the rest of the school. And then there’s Archie (Peter Umipig), whose affliction with muscular dystrophy does nothing to win him any friends. Archie also loves Kendra, and he’ll do whatever it takes to get close to her, including blackmailing Evan. So Evan’s order is big: appease the cool kids at school into coming to his Bar Mitzvah while doing good for the unpopular kids who are his true friends. And become a man.

(Incidentally, while it’s doubtful that the creators of 13 and THE PROM got together, one wonders how Indiana became the popular choice as the “dumbest place on earth?” Incidentally, between Mr. Goldman and Mr. Hansen a decade later, the Evanses of the world might start to make a name for themselves for their uncool behavior).

But back to Panic’s 13… Besides a brief video appearance by Evan’s Rabbi (played by David Shukiar), the show is for kids, the whole time and Pearl, Cooper and choreographer Michelle Elkin harnessed some real vocal talent and fantastic energy. among their distribution and use it wisely. The ensemble numbers (notably the opening “Thirteen” and the aforementioned “A Little More Homework”) provide a window into all of the characters while letting all of their collective hormones, exuberance, and doubts run rampant. In groups, these actors cook.

Individually, many of these characters fall into stock categories: brutal and stupid jock, naive beauty queen, and so on. The actors do their best to break them out of the stereotypes of Eilish and Horn’s book, but it’s not an easy battle. Misfits fare better. Brown’s Patrice deftly mixes humor, neediness, and pride, making Patrice just about the only character with a consistent moral compass; Honestly, given how much of a winner Brown is, we’re almost rooting for her to ditch Evan for the reckless thug that he is. Complicating matters is this production’s lack of strength at its core. Although his singing is solid, Daugherty feels lost as Evan, rarely tapping into the character’s brain, sadness, or inner turmoil.

Umipig is doing a solid job with Archie. Infusing crippled Archie with irony, a dollop of Machiavelli and not a hint of self-pity, the actor gives this complicated kid some real clout. He’s, unsurprisingly, the subject of the decidedly unawakened song “Terminal Illness,” a number this production ickifies by putting the female chorus in borderline sexualized nurse outfits.

13: The musical, it should be noted, is having a moment thanks to a recent film adaptation for Netflix which, of course, uses adult characters. A look back at the original Broadway production credits list reveals that the show marked the debuts of Graham Phillips and Ariana Grande.

Panic!/BTPS players could be doomed for similar success. They have homework to do (like what teenagers don’t have), but if their job here is any indication, they’re on the right track.

13 THE MUSICAL plays until September 18 at the Simi Valley Cultural Arts Center

Photo of (LR) Mia Akemi-Brown, Peter Umipig and Ethan Daugherty courtesy of Panic! Productions.

]]>
Week 5 of the Edmonds Global Plan Visioning Process: Cultural Arts and Urban Design https://shul21.org/week-5-of-the-edmonds-global-plan-visioning-process-cultural-arts-and-urban-design/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 22:56:57 +0000 https://shul21.org/week-5-of-the-edmonds-global-plan-visioning-process-cultural-arts-and-urban-design/ Susan McLaughlin What makes a city great? I guess it’s all about surprise and fun. It requires multi-sensory experiences, inspiring art and unifying design. Big cities go beyond iconic architecture and industrial hubs. I can tell you that zoning code alone will not promote greatness, nor will purely market-based factors. The question of what makes […]]]>
Susan McLaughlin

What makes a city great? I guess it’s all about surprise and fun. It requires multi-sensory experiences, inspiring art and unifying design. Big cities go beyond iconic architecture and industrial hubs. I can tell you that zoning code alone will not promote greatness, nor will purely market-based factors.

The question of what makes a city great becomes more difficult when you realize that what has worked in the past for legacy cities may not be the solution for the future. Cities have changed not only in how people access work, due to the pandemic, but also in how consumers shop. Retail is changing. Forbes reported that “Millennials prefer to spend their money on experiences, not stuff.” Cities of the past relied heavily on the physical market and trade in goods to attract people to central locations. The current dispersion of goods, services and employment areas makes it difficult to guarantee a critical mass of people in a given area.

How can cities reinvent commercial hubs and neighborhood neighborhoods to foster the experiences people seek?

The interface between public space and private space is the simple definition of urban design. Urban design considers how buildings and public space are organized to create an environment that makes people want to linger instead of just move around. While we know the city of the future will rely heavily on experiences rather than traditional business transactions, it will be important to focus on how we leverage our creative industries and deliver deeper, more meaningful places that strengthen our sense of belonging. . After all, without a sense of belonging, we lack community, and if we lack community, we lack resilience.

I lived and worked in Christchurch, New Zealand when the 2011 earthquake destroyed 70% of downtown buildings. It was important for the community to realize that the soul of the city was not in the built form, nor in the shared assets that framed the city – the river, the streets, the squares – but it was in the community spirit who have come together to shape a new Christchurch.

The new Christchurch embraced a layered but readable city that did not lose its past but celebrated it. Art and creativity sustained life in vacant spaces as the city rebuilt, and this cultural calculus became the foundation of the new central core.

Photo courtesy of the City of Christchurch

A great example of how this creativity was realized early was the project called ReStart, which was a temporary mall built from shipping containers a few months after the earthquakes to support downtown businesses. Would this have been possible within the framework of pre-earthquake planning? How can we enable this level of creative thinking and enable adaptive cultural expression in our urban and neighborhood neighborhoods?

The Town of Edmonds adopted a community cultural plan in 2014 which includes the following vision statement:

Arts and cultural experiences are integrated into daily life, work and visits to Edmonds.”

In view of the trends, this vision remains very relevant. Spreading cultural arts and urban design efforts throughout the city will be critically important over the next 20 years to support the daily lives of our city’s residents, workers and visitors.

What do you think of art, culture and urban design as we plan the future of Edmonds?

Over the next two weeks, we will focus on key topics that touch on various aspects of the Plan. Here is the composition:

  • Culture: September 5 to 11
  • Habitability and Land Use: September 12-18

Next week we begin community conversation with an accent on Edmonds‘ Culture.

Please take our Edmonds Culture mini-survey (available at https://bit.ly/culture2024, or by scanning the QR code below) and visit us next week at the following events to share your point of view :

Friends & Fries with Susan, Director of Developmental Services | 5-6 p.m. Wednesday, September 7 | Dick’s Drive-in at 21910 Highway 99 | Join us for a burger and a casual conversation about what Edmonds means to you. Free burgers for the first 50 people present.

Edmonds Summer Market | Saturday September 10 | 5e North Avenue and Main Street | Stop by our table at the market to discuss your thoughts on the future of Edmonds.

Round table: Arts Culture in Edmonds | 10.30am-noon on Saturday September 10 | Hall of the Edmonds Center for the Arts | 410 4th Ave N. | The event will feature members of the community for a discussion on Edmonds’ arts and culture scene. Space is limited. Please RSVP by email to Everyonesedmonds@edmondswa.gov to secure your spot. The event is available live at https://bit.ly/CulturePanel and will be posted on the project webpage for later viewing.

Keep an eye out for more event announcements later next week as we move into the themed community conversation on habitability and land use the week of September 12.

As a reminder, the survey on this week’s theme, the Environment, is still open and available until this Saturday, September 3, on https://bit.ly/environment2024 or by scanning this QR code:

— By Susan McLaughlin, Director of Development Services at Edmonds

]]>
Non-profit group plans cultural arts center in West Baltimore https://shul21.org/non-profit-group-plans-cultural-arts-center-in-west-baltimore/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 00:21:00 +0000 https://shul21.org/non-profit-group-plans-cultural-arts-center-in-west-baltimore/ Comment this story Comment BALTIMORE — Todd Marcus dropped out of Loyola University in Maryland 26 years ago to fight poverty in West Baltimore neighborhoods. He later helped establish the non-profit Intersection of Change in the Upton neighborhood of West Baltimore. “For me, it was an obvious decision. I had thought about it well. I […]]]>

Comment

BALTIMORE — Todd Marcus dropped out of Loyola University in Maryland 26 years ago to fight poverty in West Baltimore neighborhoods. He later helped establish the non-profit Intersection of Change in the Upton neighborhood of West Baltimore.

“For me, it was an obvious decision. I had thought about it well. I knew I wanted to be part of [West Baltimore] community,” said Marcus, the organization’s executive director.

Intersection of Change, which operates in Upton, Sandtown-Winchester and surrounding neighborhoods, is expanding.

The nonprofit has partnered with the Pennsylvania Avenue Black Arts & Entertainment District, which promotes West Baltimore’s cultural heritage and revitalization, to develop an approximately 20,000 square foot arts center called the Sanaa Center. The organizations are trying to raise $8 million for the project, which is expected to begin construction in about a year and end in 2025.

The arts and entertainment district plans to have its headquarters in central Sanaa, which will also provide artists with studio space, workshops and a venue to display their work, said Brion Gill, the organization’s executive director. Sanaa means art in Swahili.

The center will take shape on vacant land on Pennsylvania Avenue, where the city demolished 12 townhouses in the 1990s, Marcus said.

The project is expected to cost around $10 million. About $2.7 million has been raised so far, including about $800,000 from the city and nearly $600,000 from the state, Gill said.

The nonprofit, which employs about 20 people, is also renovating a two-story, 980-square-foot structure on Presstman Street, Marcus said. This project is funded by a $75,000 grant from the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development and a $55,000 donation from a private foundation. The nonprofit is trying to raise another $250,000 for it.

The projects will increase the amount of space available for Intersection of Change, which offers a residential program for women in recovery as well as an arts, workforce development and employment program for those formerly incarcerated. About 2,000 people benefit from the art program each year.

Gill said the reason she and Intersection of Change are working together to build the Sanaa center are the nonprofit organization’s innovative programs.

“They have really invested their time and talents in cleaning up the community and providing services that the people of West Baltimore really need,” she said. “It’s an organization that is really [focusing on the] work.”

Diane Scott, a Sandtown-Winchester resident, signed up for Intersection of Change’s six-month recovery program in 2015 to treat her alcoholism. She completed the program the same year.

“I thank God for [the recovery program] because when I came here, it gave me back my spirituality. The structure is phenomenal,” she said. “I am now in charge. I am now responsible.

Marcus, 46, from Haworth, NJ, lives in Sandtown-Winchester.

He met Clyde Harris, who founded Intersection of Change, while volunteering for Sandtown Habitat for Humanity in West Baltimore, where he worked cleaning up and renovating abandoned buildings.

He stopped attending Loyola in 1996. In 1999, Marcus graduated from Rutgers University with a bachelor’s degree in urban studies.

Intersection was founded in the mid-1990s. Harris’ wife, Amelia, is a co-founder.

“The goal was to meet the needs of our community – look at what wasn’t being addressed and provide services to residents of our community,” Marcus said.

Harris, a member of the association’s board of directors, pointed out that Marcus does not run Intersection alone. Marcus is working with him to fight poverty in West Baltimore, Harris said.

“Our community doesn’t want to feel like a white man [one of Marcus’s parents is White, while the other is Egyptian] came here to deliver us. No, it was Todd and me together. We reconcile as human beings and work together,” said Harris, who is black.

In addition to his work with Intersection, Marcus is an active musician.

Clarinetist since fourth grade, he plays the bass clarinet and composes music. The Baltimore Museum of Art, Motor House and Keystone Korner are among the venues in Baltimore where he has performed.

He said it was difficult to juggle his job at Intersection and his career as a musician.

He now takes night walks at Gwynns Falls/Leakin Park in West Baltimore, a 10-minute drive from his home.

“It’s hard because there are [are] only so many hours in the day,” he said.

]]>
The Cultural Arts Center is hosting a free evening of art to present four new exhibitions in September https://shul21.org/the-cultural-arts-center-is-hosting-a-free-evening-of-art-to-present-four-new-exhibitions-in-september/ Tue, 30 Aug 2022 15:56:28 +0000 https://shul21.org/the-cultural-arts-center-is-hosting-a-free-evening-of-art-to-present-four-new-exhibitions-in-september/ GLEN ALLEN, Va. (WRIC) — Local art lovers will have the chance to check out new exhibits and chat with local artists at a free art night next month. On Thursday, September 15, the Center culturel des arts will organize an artistic evening in honor of four new exhibitions. The event will take place at […]]]>

GLEN ALLEN, Va. (WRIC) — Local art lovers will have the chance to check out new exhibits and chat with local artists at a free art night next month.

On Thursday, September 15, the Center culturel des arts will organize an artistic evening in honor of four new exhibitions. The event will take place at 2880 Mountain Road in Glen Allen and will run from 6-8 p.m.

The four exhibitions at the center of the evening showcase a wide variety of mediums and also celebrate local culture and materials. “Kaleidoscope – Rekindling a History” by the Kummba Afrikan American Quilting Guild shows the colorful and unique art of traditional quilting, “The Peaches will be Blue” by Kay Vass Darling features collages and acrylic paintings that play with color and the motif, “Richmond: A Diary” by John Price offers a personal collection of photographs illustrating life in Richmond and “Unusual Turnings” by Barbara Dill presents wooden sculptures made from local materials.

Entry to the evening is free and the event will also feature live music, a cash bar and a chance to meet the artists behind the latest exhibits. You can also explore the sculpture garden and discover pieces made by local artists in the gift shop.

]]>